Ottawa imposes new measures on fishermen in effort to protect endangered whales

first_imgFREDERICTON – Ottawa is imposing strict new measures on the lobster fishery in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in an effort to protect North Atlantic right whales.A total of 18 North Atlantic right whales were killed in Canadian and U.S. waters last year — mainly due to vessel strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.There are only about 450 of the whales left, and many spend their summers feeding in the Gulf.Moira Brown, senior research scientist with the Canadian Whale Institute, said unless the numbers change, the North Atlantic right whale could become functionally extinct in less than 25 years.The new measures announced by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans on Tuesday include restrictions on the amount of rope used.“No rope attaching a lobster trap to a primary buoy shall remain floating on the surface of the water after the lobster trap has been set,” the new rules state.It will be mandatory to report any lost gear.“The new management measure will help quantify the amount of gear lost annually and identify the need to increase efforts to retrieve gear that has been lost, which would reduce the risks of whale entanglements.”Lobster fishermen are also required to report all whale sightings and document any interactions such as collisions or entanglements.When whales are spotted, an area around them will be temporarily closed to fishing.“Closures will be in force for a minimum period of 15 days and will be extended by 15 days from the last North Atlantic right whale sighting.”The department is also imposing a static closure in an area where 90 per cent of the whale observations occurred in 2017 to provide a large gear-free area for the whales.Similar measures had already been imposed on the Gulf-region crab fishery.On Monday, New Brunswick Liberal MP Karen Ludwig put forward a private member’s motion in the House of Commons, in an effort to have the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans do a study on all endangered species of whales in Canada.last_img read more

Jet was within 100 feet of hitting 2 planes in San Francisco

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – An Air Canada plane with 140 people on board came within 30 metres of crashing onto two of four planes lined up to take off at San Francisco International Airport last week, according to a preliminary report Canadian air safety regulators released Thursday.The finding provided the first official accounting of how close the Air Canada plane came to causing what could have been one of the worst disasters in commercial aviation history.Instead of lining up to land on the runway, the pilot of the flight from Toronto mistakenly descended toward a parallel taxiway just to the right of where four other airliners were idling in the darkness. Taxiways are the aviation equivalent of feeder roads that planes use to roll between runways and terminals, and have different lights than runways.Canada’s Transportation Safety Board released a short summary of the July 7 incident, which U.S. authorities are still investigating. The summary said Air Canada Flight 759 had already travelled one-quarter of a mile over the taxiway before aborting the landing.As the Airbus 320 pulled up sharply it flew 30 metres over the first two jets, about 60 metres above the third and about 90 metres over the fourth, the summary said. It then circled and landed safely.“This was very close to a catastrophic event,” said John Cox, a safety consultant and retired airline pilot.The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, which is heading the investigation, has not released any information and spokesman Keith Holloway said he could not comment on another agency’s data.Transportation Safety Board of Canada spokesman Chris Krepski said he could not confirm the source of the data in the document, which was released as part of a “daily notification log” of safety incidents that Canadian air operators are obliged to report to regulators.The most likely source was Air Canada, but company spokeswoman Angela Mah would only say in an email that the airline is “investigating the circumstances and co-operating with authorities.” She said because of the investigation, she could provide no more information.Collisions on the ground are particularly dangerous because planes waiting to take off are loaded with fuel. The deadliest crash in aviation history occurred in 1977 when a KLM Boeing 747 taking off in the Canary Islands plowed into a Pan Am 747 that was waiting to take off; 583 people died in the crash and fires.There are several cases in the United States when landing planes either hit another aircraft on the ground or barely cleared one. In the instances that safety consultant Cox recalled, including several at Los Angeles International Airport, the pilots of the landing plane could not see the other airplane.“What is so unusual about this one is the airplanes could see each other and they still got this close,” Cox said. “These guys really did intend to land on this taxiway.”In audio posted on liveatc.net, which records flight communications, the pilot said he sees “some lights on the runway,” apparently alluding to planes on the taxiway.According to the report released Thursday, the plane at that point was less than a mile from the taxiway. It would have been flying well over 160 kilometres per hour.“That’s awful to let it go that far,” said Chris Manno, an American Airlines pilot for 32 years who regularly lands in San Francisco. “Pretty egregious.”The controller assured the pilot there is no one on the runway. Seconds later, another voice — apparently one of the pilots on the taxiway — interjects, “Where’s this guy going? He’s on the taxiway.”Only at that point did the controller order the Air Canada jet to pull up.___Pritchard reported from Los Angeles. Contact him at https://twitter.com/lalanewsmanlast_img read more

BC government to bring back human rights commission after 15 years

first_imgVANCOUVER – British Columbia’s NDP government is bringing back the province’s human rights commission, which was scuttled by the previous Liberal regime in 2002 in favour of a complaint-driven tribunal.Premier John Horgan said B.C. is the only province without a commission that can take proactive steps to address systemic inequalities and prevent discrimination based on race, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity.“We have to ensure that if we allow intolerance to rear its head, we together have to stand and push it back down again,” Horgan said Friday, speaking in Vancouver’s gay-friendly West End neighbourhood two days before the city’s Pride parade.“One critical element to make sure we do that is establishing again in British Columbia, like every other province in the country, a human rights commission.”Asked whether he thought intolerance was on the rise in B.C., Horgan said incidents have been brought to his attention over the past two years of systemic hate and racism toward ethnic and religious groups. He declined to elaborate.Attorney General David Eby said the current human rights tribunal has done a good job of making sure there is a place where people can have their disputes heard and resolved.“However, that model relies on people taking the initiative and having the ability to go file a claim and wait the long period of time it takes to have a decision rendered and then to enforce it,” he said.“We need a commission with the power to do more — to educate about human rights, to prevent discrimination from taking place and to support people in addressing systemic discrimination.”Eby said he has asked parliamentary secretary Ravi Kahlon to lead a public consultation process that will include both online and face-to-face meetings with B.C. residents, stakeholders and human rights experts.The consultation process will start in September, with legislation for the creation of the commission expected next year.Human rights commissions are typically arms-length agencies of the government that promote and enforce human rights and engage in education, policy development, public inquiries, litigation and research.For example, the Ontario Human Rights Commission published a policy position last March on sexualized dress codes in the workplace that advises both employers and employees of their obligations and rights.Morgane Oger, a transgender-rights advocate who ran for the provincial NDP in a Vancouver-area riding, said she’s currently involved in three human-rights cases, including one challenging the requirement for gender to be specified on birth certificates.“That’s a daunting task. It’s extremely intimidating. I’ve helped people who have gone to the human rights tribunal by themselves and they’re terrified and they have no idea what they’re getting into,” she said.Oger said she advises people to expect that they will spend about $15,000 a day on lawyer’s fees and tribunal hearings can last three to five days. Preventing discrimination before it happens is far less expensive, she said.“If you have to recall all of the cars after they’ve been on the road, it’s way (more costly) than putting up your hand and fixing the drawing at design time.”Josh Paterson, executive director of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said that in the past, complainants could only have their case heard by the tribunal if the commission decided to take it on. He said he didn’t expect the government to return to that model.In Ontario, complainants can go directly to a tribunal, and there is also a commission to do the proactive work, he said.Paterson said he hoped the commission would have a strong educational function, which would be helpful for the general public as well as businesses and landlords.“It’s been a huge gap that B.C. hasn’t had a human rights commission all this time. There’s been no government agency tasked with education or promoting anti-discrimination, and that’s really vital.”— Follow @ellekane on Twitter.last_img read more

Partnership hopes to make progress on pancreatic cancer with research network

first_imgTORONTO – Kevin Rabishaw had the classic signs — persistent back and abdominal pain, sudden onset of diabetes and pronounced weight loss — but as too often happens with pancreatic cancer, his symptoms weren’t diagnosed early enough to make a difference.Despite having surgery to remove a large tumour on his pancreas, followed by rounds of chemotherapy, Rabishaw died last month at age 57, just nine months after his diagnosis.It is an all too familiar story for health professionals and cancer advocacy groups who deal with this malignancy, the fourth deadliest cancer affecting Canadians, which accounts for six per cent of all cancer deaths in the country.Yet despite having such a lethal profile — only seven per cent of patients live five years from diagnosis — pancreatic cancer is among the most poorly funded when it comes to research dollars, with only about two per cent of all monies raised for cancer going to this type of tumour.“It has become almost a forgotten cancer, and yet it’s so devastating to the people who get it,” said Michelle Capobianco, executive director of the Pancreatic Cancer Canada Foundation (PCCF), an organization that raises funds for research, awareness and education.“The reality is that there have been very few advances in the last 40 years,” she said. “So basically what you would be told 40 years ago is what you’re told today.”The advocacy group is hoping to change that with a partnership to boost research into pancreatic cancer. Along with the Cancer Research Society, PCCF is launching the Pancreatic Oncology Network, or PancOne, a two-year joint project to raise $2 million for research committed solely to the fight against this cancer.To be announced Thursday, the partnership follows a bold multimedia awareness-raising campaign called “Assumptions Can Be Deadly.”This year, an estimated 5,500 Canadians will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and about 4,800 will die from the disease, Canadian Cancer Society statistics indicate.The pancreas is a finger-like organ that releases enzymes into the small intestine to aid digestion and insulin into the bloodstream to control how the body uses food for energy.But because it is buried deep within the abdomen, symptoms of pancreatic cancer typically don’t become evident until the disease is quite advanced, leading to its description as a silent killer. More than 60 per cent of tumours are diagnosed at a late stage, usually having spread, or metastasized to other parts of the body, thereby limiting chances for successful treatment.“In many cases, it’s silent until its already metastatic,” said Dr. Steven Gallinger, a surgical oncologist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto.“Only about 20 per cent of patients are eligible for surgery because the other 80 per cent have metastatic disease when we meet them for the first time,” he said, adding that this cancer also tends to be highly resistant to chemotherapy.Although cancer of the pancreas can strike adults at any age, about 90 per cent of those who develop the disease are over 55, with an average age of about 70.While the cause isn’t yet known, Gallinger said genetics and lifestyle factors such as excess alcohol consumption and eating a western diet high in red meat and low in fibre seem to be risk factors for the disease.“Then the convincing factor that’s definitely associated is smoking,” he said, noting that tobacco use raises the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by two to three times.Despite what may seem a grim outlook, Gallinger said the PancOne partnership offers hope that increased dedicated funding will lead to research breakthroughs in the next few years.The $2-million target could attract matching or even higher grants from other funding institutions and government, boosting overall research dollars, he said.“For a long time, we were kind of the orphan, unnoticed, unloved research group around the world,” Gallinger said of scientists probing the mysteries of pancreatic cancer, “meaning advocacy was minimal, so governments didn’t respond well to the need for more work.“There’s also been frustrations in attracting young people to try to delve into this challenge … (but) in the last 10 to 20 years, there’s been significant improvement in awareness, which gradually trickles out to funding agencies.”For Kevin Rabishaw, the need for greater awareness of pancreatic cancer and its symptoms — as well as increased research funding — was close to his heart, said Bryna Rabishaw, his wife of 31 years.Before his death, he took part in a video made by PCCF “to help so the next patient has more time with their family,” she recalled her husband saying.Rabishaw, an avid outdoorsman who included making maple syrup among his many hobbies, also left a legacy to his family and friends in the form of a sugar shack on the couple’s property in Sharon, Ont., just north of Toronto, which he designed and had built by a carpenter in the weeks leading up to his death.“The maple syrup season for 2017 became a really, really big deal for us,” Bryna Rabishaw said tearfully, adding that their adult son and daughter helped him tap maple trees near their property and their dad taught them how to boil it off and bottle the resulting syrup.It was a hobby he relished, and his family and friends plan to continue it next year in his memory.While she doesn’t blame doctors for missing the red flags of her husband’s cancer — PCCF says many health professionals can be unaware of the signs — Rabishaw hopes his story will encourage others with suspicious symptoms to get them investigated quickly.“If they could have put the pieces together earlier,” she said, “I truly believe that he would have still been here.”—Online:www.assumptionscanbedeadly.ca– Follow @SherylUbelacker on Twitter.last_img read more

More work needed to ensure timely justice departing Beverley McLachlin says

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s retiring top judge says more must be done to ensure the justice system is accessible to everyone in a timely way — and Beverley McLachlin hopes she will continue to play a part in the reform process.McLachlin steps away from the Supreme Court after 28 years — including almost 18 as chief justice — and more than 2,000 cases on everything from assisted dying to interprovincial trade.She reflected Friday on the work of the court in the post-Charter of Rights and Freedoms era and her belief that the justice system belongs to the public.“I hope that I’ve tried to make it more open and reassure Canadians that the courts are their courts and that we the judges who serve on those courts are all dedicated to providing better justice for Canadians,” she said during a news conference.A landmark 2016 ruling from the high court defined time limits for completing criminal trials, but McLachlin says more must be done to address delays and costs that pose barriers.“I believe that access to justice, being able to use the justice system, is something that every Canadian is entitled to.”The federal justice minister, attorneys general from across the country and judges are focusing on the problem and making changes, she said. McLachlin is impressed with smaller efforts, such as more readily available information on the legal process and discounted legal services to help people navigate the system.“There is much being done, and there’s much more we can do. And I’m hoping that when I retire I can continue in some way to push this project of access to justice, and making justice more accessible to all women, men and children in Canada.”At a gala sendoff Thursday night, McLachlin was toasted by former governor general Adrienne Clarkson, former prime minister Brian Mulroney — who appointed her to the high court — and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Notably, but perhaps not surprisingly, absent was Stephen Harper, who publicly tangled with the court during his time as prime minister.In a statement, Trudeau said McLachlin, the eldest of five siblings raised in rural Alberta, remained grounded and down-to-earth despite a meteoric rise through the judiciary.“She understood that the law had to be meaningful and accessible to Canadians and demonstrated this through judicial decisions written in clear, understandable language.”McLachlin demurred Friday when asked about her legacy, but said she tried to uphold the law in a responsible, pragmatic way for the people whose lives it touched.Her impact could be felt for a while yet.Though McLachlin officially retired Friday, she will have a say on judgments in cases she has heard, as long as they are released by June 15. If any come out after that date, the judgment will note that she had no input into the decision.McLachlin said she is proud of the work the court has done on First Nations files and in the development of a legal structure into which Indigenous rights can function, as well as her “small role” in the development of jurisprudence under the charter.She singled out the federal reference to the court on Quebec secession as one of her more difficult cases.“It was very challenging because it was at the edge, at that fine line between constitutional law and political matters. We had to be very careful what we said and what we did.”The justice system has come a long way over the years in recognizing the special needs of people with mental illness who have committed crimes, for instance by diverting them into streams that make medical care available, she said.“There’s an increasing recognition that we have to find other ways to deal with this considerable problem of mental health in the justice system.”While she wants to continue fostering more universal access to justice, McLachlin seems confident that Canada’s highest court is in good hands.“What have I left undone? No doubt a great deal,” she said. “There’s much left to do out there, but it will be for someone else.”— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitterlast_img read more

NS system for people with disabilities had dark roots expert tells inquiry

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s system to support people with intellectual disabilities has dark roots in a poorhouse system that led to attitudes they should remain segregated and controlled, a human rights inquiry was told Tuesday.The inquiry is looking at whether two Nova Scotians with disabilities have the right to live in supported housing — meaning, in the community, rather than institutions and psychiatric facilities.Michael Bach, a researcher and advocate for inclusion, was called to testify by the Disability Rights Coalition, an advocacy group for people with disabilities that is a complainant in the proceeding.Bach was hired in 2012 by the former NDP government to help transform its system for people with disabilities, and to help close its remaining institutions.After outlining the repeated reports and studies calling for the changes over several decades, Bach told lawyer Claire McNeil about the history of poorhouses, where people lived in crowded settings away from the main community.He said that approach changed for most poor people at the beginning of the 20th century, as they were allowed to move into the community with income supports.But the same shift didn’t occur as quickly for people with disabilities, as large facilities with municipal boards of directors continued operating around the province.“Who gets left is those who had more significant needs and don’t have the income to purchase the supports they needed to live in communities on their own,” Bach said.He said the notion of a person having little control over their own lives lies in this history.An independent report on an incident at the former Braemore facility in Sydney, N.S., was also a big factor in the desire for change, he said.The Canadian Press had reported on a 2010 case in which an adult man with autism was locked alone in a constantly lit room at the adult residential centre for 15 days with occasional breaks. A provincial investigation said videos constantly monitored him, and on several occasions, he urinated in a corner when he was unable to get a staff member’s attention.As a “people-centred approach” became more common around the world, Bach said Nova Scotia started to realize change was necessary.He said the view of provincial officials who hired him was that a “transformation” had to occur.“There wasn’t a notion of ‘Let’s do some tinkering with the system, let’s do some incremental changes,’” he said during testimony before inquiry chairperson J. Walter Thompson.“There was a recognition it needed to be transformed,” he said.However, the inquiry has heard opening arguments from the lawyers representing people with intellectual disabilities that this transformation is incomplete, particularly in the case of their clients.Forty-five-year-old Joseph Delaney and 46-year-old Beth MacLean say they should be permitted to move from the hospital-like settings into small homes where assistance is provided in areas such as meals and personal care.A third complainant, Sheila Livingstone, died as the case wound its way through various delays, but her story will be told by family members and the complainants’ lawyer.There were 504 people awaiting some form of support from the Department of Community Services as of last Thursday, and 1,024 people awaiting a transfer to a different housing option or location.A Justice Department lawyer at the hearing has said the province may agree with the principle of providing supports, but it’s not necessarily a human rights violation for the province to refuse funding or eliminate waiting lists.The province also says it is working to improve its Disability Support Program and to create more small-options homes.The province’s lawyer is expected to cross examine Bach on Wednesday, while the lawyer for the two complainants with intellectual disabilities is expected to call his first witnesses.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more

Canadian facing child exploitation charges arrested near US border

first_imgHOULTON, Maine – U.S. border patrol officers have charged three Canadians with unlawful entry after they were seen walking in northern Maine, including one man facing child exploitation charges in Nova Scotia.According to court documents filed June 1 with the U.S. District Court in Bangor, Maine, the three were apprehended May 31 near Houlton, Maine, which is not far from the border crossing at Woodstock, N.B.The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency alleges that Jesse Christopher Leblanc, Chelsey Ann Fitch of Fredericton and Aaron Byron Cumberland of Nova Scotia crossed the border at a spot that is not designated as a port of entry.In an affidavit submitted to the court, border patrol agent Matthew McLellan said the three were seen carrying backpacks on the Canadian side of the border on a road parallel to the international boundary before they were spotted on a road in Maine that leads away from the border.The agent said a fingerprint check later determined Cumberland is facing charges in Nova Scotia, including luring a child and invitation to sexual touching, though he had been released on conditions.McLellan’s affidavit says those conditions include an order that he remain in Nova Scotia and refrain from possessing any electronic device that can access the internet. The affidavit says Cumberland had a cellphone and a laptop with him when he was arrested.McLellan said all three initially offered false identities, saying they had “no claimed countries of citizenship.”The agent said none of them was carrying proper identification.“They also initially claimed to not believe in or recognize international borders or boundaries but believe that travel between countries should be free and uninhibited.”last_img read more

Aldo footwear chain erroneously caught up in CanadianUS trade dispute

first_imgMONTREAL – Quebec footwear retailer Aldo found itself temporaily at the heart of the current Canadian-U.S. trade dispute after being linked to President Donald Trump.The company was included in a Maclean’s magazine list of retailers that are either owned by Trump and his family or sell Trump goods.The objective of the list first published Sunday is to inform consumers where they can hurt Trump in the pocketbook.Aldo then went online to state it is a private family-run company that has no connection to any Trump businesses.Maclean’s acknowledged the error and withdrew Aldo from the list, which includes Hudson’s Bay and Walmart.Aldo was founded in 1972.last_img

Doug Ford slams federal carbon tax that takes effect in four provinces

first_imgTORONTO — Ontario Premier Doug Ford says there’s no reason to believe Canadians will recoup the cost of the federal carbon tax that takes effect today.Ford, whose government is fighting the tax in court, says he doesn’t trust Ottawa to make good on its promise to provide rebates to businesses and residents of the provinces where the tax is kicking in.The feds imposed the tax in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick after those provinces opted not to impose their own pricing schemes on carbon emissions.Residents of those provinces will be getting rebates on their income tax returns that start at $128 annually and increase for people with spouses or dependents at home.Ottawa has yet to reveal details about a program to rebate some of the increased costs faced by small- and medium-sized businesses.The federal government says the carbon tax is a sensible way to protect the environment — put a price on activities that pollute to discourage emissions, and give back most or all of the money through income taxes.The federal tax is $20 a tonne for this year and is set to increase by $10 annually until it reaches $50 a tonne in April 2022.The starting rate adds 4.4 cents to the price of a litre of gas, about four cents to a cubic metre of natural gas, and also drives up the cost of propane, butane and aviation fuel.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Some facts and figures about the DDay landings in Normandy on June

first_imgOTTAWA — Some facts and figures about the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944:TARGET: Allies land on French channel coast along five Normandy beaches stretching about 80 kilometres west from River Orne.BEACHES: From west to east, Utah (U.S.); Omaha (U.S.); Gold (Britain); Juno (Canada); Sword (Britain).FEATURES OF JUNO: Eight-kilometre strip of summer resorts and villages scattered over flat land behind low beaches and a sea wall. Many Canadians in first wave race to cover of sea wall. D Company of Queen’s Own Rifles loses half its strength in initial sprint from water to seawall about 180 metres away.ENEMY AT JUNO: About 400 soldiers of 716th Infantry Division man concrete gun positions sited to fire along beach. Zones of fire calculated to interlock on coastal obstacles intended to rip bottoms out of invading boats. Gun positions protected by mines, trenches, barbed wire.SHIPS: More than 7,000 vessels manned by 285,000 sailors. Royal Canadian Navy contributes 110 ships and 10,000 sailors.SOLDIERS: 130,000 ashore by nightfall, including about 14,000 Canadians.VEHICLES: 6,000 tracked and wheeled vehicles and 600 guns land.PLANES: More than 7,000 bombers and fighters available. Allied planes fly about 14,000 sorties June 6, against about 250 by Luftwaffe.D-DAY CASUALTIES (killed, wounded and missing): Canada: 1,074, including 359 killed; U.S. 6,000; Britain: 3,200. Germany figures unreliable because of confusion in retreat.CAMPAIGN CASUALTIES (killed, wounded and missing): In 2-plus months of Normandy campaign (June 6-Aug. 21) Germans lose 450,000 soldiers, Allies 210,000. Canadian casualties total more than 18,000, including more than 5,000 dead.ALLIED LEADERS: Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower (U.S.), Supreme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force. Gen. Sir Bernard Law Montgomery (Britain), Field Commander, D-Day Forces.CANADIAN LEADERS: Gen. Harry Crerar, Commander 1st Canadian Army. Maj.-Gen. Rod Keller, Commander 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.DIVISIONS INVOLVED: Canadian 3rd Infantry Division; British 3rd and 50th Infantry Divisions; U.S. 1st and 4th Infantry Divisions. (All had armoured units attached).The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Federal leaders scatter across country as campaign ramps up in earnest

first_imgOTTAWA — Federal party leaders have scattered across the country today as the election campaign starts to ramp up in earnest.Today was the legal deadline for Justin Trudeau to ask the Governor General to dissolve Parliament and call the election, but the Liberal leader got the jump on that by starting the campaign last Wednesday.The first six days were marked by numerous candidates across the partisan spectrum turfed from their rosters or forced to apologize for past homophobic and racist remarks.The Liberals were also haunted by the re-emergence of the SNC-Lavalin scandal and questions about the RCMP investigation running up against issues of cabinet confidence, while Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer found himself again needing to address his socially conservative views.And the NDP found themselves constantly facing questions about whether they were ready to run at all, considering they had yet to nominate dozens of candidates.Today, all three main parties hope to regain some solid footing with the Liberals in and around Toronto, the Conservatives in B.C. and the NDP in Quebec.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Scheer Trudeau talk platforms firearms in Toronto Singh stays out west

first_imgOTTAWA — The federal Liberal election platform is out, and it’s brimming with talking points not only for Justin Trudeau, but for his political rivals as well.There’s billions in new spending — $57 billion worth, according to Conservative math — to be financed in part by new taxes on the wealthy, large international corporations, foreign housing speculators and tech giants.There’s billions in red ink, too: the platform projects a $27.4-billion deficit next year, falling to $21 billion by year 4 of what would be a second Liberal mandate, should Trudeau’s growth-and-investment approach win out over what he calls the cuts and austerity of Andrew Scheer’s Tories.Scheer will no doubt have plenty to say today about what the Conservatives consider Liberal disregard for the federal balance sheet — an image Trudeau seemed to lean into Sunday as an important point of distinction between the two parties.Trudeau, for his part, will be in Toronto talking to health care professionals about what he has promised a re-elected Liberal government would do about guns — a hot topic in a city that as of last weekend had seen 325 shooting incidents this year alone, 26 of them fatal, according to Toronto police data.Scheer, who is also in the Toronto area, will be facing questions, too. The Liberals are trying to make hay with the fact that the Conservative leader never finished the licensing process to become an insurance broker, a job description he says he had before politics. The party says he was accredited, but left the industry before getting his licence.The Conservative campaign will begin the day with an announcement in the critical suburb of Whitby, Ont., with stops planned in Toronto and nearby Scarborough and Brampton — all part of the tactically important suburban belt ringing Canada’s most populous city. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh continues to focus his efforts on the Vancouver area, and his attacks on the Liberals.Green Leader Elizabeth May is beginning her day in Vancouver, while People’s Party Leader Maxime Bernier travels to Windsor, Ont.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 30, 2019.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Grammy Auctions Raise Money For Charity

first_imgGRAMMY Charity Online Auctions — in celebration of the 55th Annual GRAMMY Awards, will offer more than 100 exclusive items including once-in-a-lifetime VIP experiences, memorabilia from world-renowned celebrities and official GRAMMY merchandise signed by participating stars backstage during rehearsals and the day of the telecast.Items featured in the auction include VIP Concert and meet-and-greet experiences with Celine Dion, Lil Wayne, Miguel and Esperanza Spalding; an outfit worn onstage by GRAMMY nominee Carly Rae Jepsen during her Las Vegas Concert; VIP Tickets for the upcoming Coachella and Stagecoach festivals; official GRAMMY merchandise autographed backstage at the 55th GRAMMY Awards rehearsals and telecast by celebrity participants; guitars autographed by the Black Keys, Maroon 5, Jason Aldean; and music memorabilia autographed by Adele, Mariah Carey, Eminem, fun., Nicki Minaj, Katy Perry, Sting, and Jack White, among other items.Presented in partnership with Kompolt, The lots are available for bid in two cycles now through Feb. 21 at www.ebay.com/grammy. All proceeds will benefit MusiCares and the GRAMMY Foundation.last_img read more

Amy Poehlers Smart Girls Celebrates Women In Science

first_imgEarlier this month, Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls and YouTube Science Show “It’s Okay To Be Smart” released a video featuring clips of women who acknowledged and honored women in science for making a positive impact on their lives.Video: What #ScienceWoman Inspires You?“From a young age, girls show the same interest and ability in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) as boys, but powerful stereotypes tell them that women aren’t welcome in science,” stated the Team Smart Girls. “It’s time to break those stereotypes, and we can’t do it without strong science role models for girls and young women.”The video features dedications to teachers, YouTube Science aficionados and experts, inventors, scientists, and every-day women who spread their love of science. The video also features an appearance from Susan Sarandon, whose woman in science hero is classic actress and inventor Hedy Lamarr.Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls began as an online show, created by actress, comedian, and writer Amy Poehler and producer Meredith Walker. From there, it grew to become an online community and information hub for young people. Team Smart Girls describe their community as “a hub for teens, parents, teachers and fans of all ages to learn, to become a part of the greater Smart Girl community, and to participate in Smart Girl projects. The website has grown and evolved toward online campaigns to engage followers in volunteerism, civic activism, cultural exchange, and self-expression through the arts.”Copyright ©2015Look to the Starslast_img read more

Deepak Chopra To Explore Consciousness At 3Day Symposium

first_imgBest-selling author and world-renowned expert on mind-body medicine, Deepak Chopra, M.D., initiates a groundbreaking dialogue about the science of consciousness at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, from Friday, September 9 to Sunday, September 11, 2016.Presented by The Chopra Foundation, the event offers attendees the opportunity to come together and learn from some of the world’s greatest minds in quantum consciousness, neuroscience, cosmology, physics, psychology, and spirituality as they tackle life’s toughest questions to reveal a more complete truth of our existence.The award-winning Berklee Indian Ensemble will perform live at the event on Friday, September 9.Internationally recognized musician, filmmaker, and humanitarian, Michael Franti, will perform live at the event on Saturday, September 10.“We are in the midst of a major paradigm shift in science. Scientists are now proving what the ancient sages have known for thousands of years. So, how does consciousness conceive, govern, construct and become the physical universe? How does our understanding of consciousness enhance our collective capacity for physical, emotional, spiritual, social, financial and ecological well-being?” said Deepak Chopra, M.D., F.A.C.P., founder of The Chopra Foundation. “Our panel of world-class scientists and sages will examine these and other questions, with a shared interest in finding common ground between science and wisdom.”Presenters include: World-renowned expert in cosmology and applied mathematics, George Ellis, Ph.D. Founder of Artocene, pioneer of the contemporary arts, medicine and health movement, Iva Fattorini, M.D., M.Sc. Theoretical astrophysicist, Katherine Freese. New York Times best-selling author, filmmaker, and professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley Edward Frenkel. Anesthesiologist, professor and quantum consciousness expert Stuart Hameroff, M.D. Spirit-being, frequency addict, composer, artist, & DJ, Satya Hinduja. Award-winning science journalist and author, John Horgan. Psychologist and neuroscientist, Shamini Jain. Physicist and science writer, Menas C. Kafatos, Ph.D. Inventor of quantum neural computing and pioneering archaeoastronomer, Dr Subhash Kak. Artist, Jitish Kallat. World-renowned scientist and expert in metaphysics, Bernardo Kastrup, Ph.D. Professor at UCSD and co-founder of the American Gut Project, Rob Knight. International corporate strategist, investment banker and public intellectual with a doctorate in brain research, Robert Kuhn, Ph.D. Actress, producer, director, activist and businesswoman, Eva Longoria. Serial entrepreneur and business leader in Fortune 100 companies, Poonacha Machaiah. Expert in exploration of spiritual realities using innovative scientific approaches, Dr. Barnaby Marsh. Chair and Distinguished Professor of Neurosciences and Florence Riford Chair for Alzheimer Disease Research at UC San Diego School of Medicine, William C. Mobley, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of physics and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Joel R, Primack, Ph.D. President of Berklee College of Music, cofounder of Bright Horizons Family Solutions, and an international relief agency manager, Roger H. Brown. Political activist, speaker, and supermodel, Cameron Russell. Master integrator of big data to construct predictive models of disease and wellness, Dr. Eric Schadt. Senior media executive, former ABC news journalist, and chief curator of Discovery Communications’ Curiosity Project, Richard Sergay. New York Times bestselling author and pioneer in the integrative field of Interpersonal Neurobiology, Dr. Dan Siegel. Founder of Ashtanga Yoga New York, Eddie Stern. Professor of neurology and holder of the Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Endowed Chair in Neurology at Harvard University, Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D. Model and founder of Strala Yoga, Tara Stiles. Award-winning and internationally acclaimed soul chant musician, Chandrika Tandon. Professor of pathology and of medicine at the Beth Israel Medical Center of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Neil Theise, M.D. Spiritual leader, Reverend Mpho A. Tutu.For more information and to purchase tickets for the Sages & Scientists Symposium 2016 visit: www.chopra.com/programs/sages-scientist/sages-scientists-2016.last_img read more

Prince William And Prince Harry Attend European Premiere Of Star Wars The

first_imgThe European Premiere of Star Wars: The Last Jedi was hosted in aid of The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.Prince William and Prince Harry Attend Premiere of Star Wars: The Last JediCredit/Copyright: Royal.ukAttended by The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry, The Royal Foundation invited more than 400 young people, military veterans and volunteers who have taken part in its programmes to join Their Royal Highnesses at the premiere.There were representatives from Coach Core, Full Effect, and military programmes such as the Endeavour Fund. The premiere was an opportunity to recognise and celebrate people who have worked hard to change their lives and the lives of others.On behalf of The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry, The Royal Foundation also invited some of the families who were affected by the Grenfell Tower tragedy, alongside representatives of the local fire services and the charities and organisations who are now helping them recover and try to rebuild their lives.Before the performance, Their Royal Highnesses met a selection of beneficiaries from The Royal Foundation and also some of the families and representatives of organisations working with those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire. Their Royal Highnesses then meet members of the film’s cast and crew, along with senior executives from Walt Disney Studios and Lucasfilm and were presented with their very own Stormtrooper helmets before watching the latest in the Skywalker saga.Source:Royal.uklast_img read more

AARP The Magazine Announces Nominees For The 17th Annual Movies For Grownups

first_imgAARP The Magazine is pleased to announce the nominees for the upcoming 17th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards, with Get Out, Lady Bird, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, The Shape of Water and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri contending in the Best Picture/Best Movie for Grownups category.The awards celebrate 2017’s standout films with unique appeal to movie lovers with a grownup state of mind and recognize the inspiring artists who make them. Award-winning film and stage actor Alan Cumming will host the star-studded evening at the Beverly Wilshire, Beverly Hills on Monday, February 5.In the Best Actress category, nominations go to Annette Bening (Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool), Judi Dench (Victoria & Abdul), Salma Hayek (Beatriz at Dinner), Frances McDormand (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) and Meryl Streep (The Post). In the Best Actor category, Steve Carell (Battle of the Sexes), Daniel-Day Lewis (Phantom Thread), Tom Hanks (The Post), Gary Oldman (Darkest Hour), Denzel Washington (Roman J. Israel, Esq.).Additionally, Helen Mirren will receive the esteemed Movies for Grownups Career Achievement Award.The nominees for Best Supporting Actress are Holly Hunter (The Big Sick), Allison Janney (I, Tonya), Melissa Leo (Novitiate), Lesley Manville (Phantom Thread), and Laurie Metcalf (Lady Bird). In the Best Supporting Actor category, Willem Dafoe (The Florida Project), Laurence Fishburne (Last Flag Flying), Woody Harrelson (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), Richard Jenkins (The Shape of Water), and Christopher Plummer (All the Money in the World) are nominated. The 2017 Movies for Grownups nominees for Best Director are Kenneth Branagh (Murder on the Orient Express), Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of Water), Reginald Hudlin (Marshall), Ridley Scott (All the Money in the World) and Steven Spielberg (The Post).“2017 was filled with marvelous movies and performances that appeal directly to a powerful audience -the 50-plus. We are delighted to celebrate another year of actors, directors and writers that brought the most compelling stories to life on the silver screen,” says Myrna Blyth, Senior Vice President and Editorial Director for AARP Media. “After nearly two decades of celebrating AARP’s Movies for Grownups, we are also thrilled to share our awards show with viewers at home.”Co-produced by the Great Performances series, the 17th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards will be broadcast for the first time on Friday, February 23 at 9 p.m. on PBS, (check local listings), pbs.org/gperf and PBS apps.Event proceeds raise funds for AARP Foundation, AARP’s charitable affiliate, which works to end senior poverty by building economic opportunity and social connections for vulnerable older adults in L.A. and across the country.With weekly news and reviews, nationwide screenings, and an annual awards event, AARP’s Movies for Grownups multimedia franchise continues to champion movies for grownups, by grownups. For more information about AARP’s Movies for Grownups Awards, go online to www.aarp.org/moviesforgrownups.The complete list of the 17th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards Nominees: • Best Picture/Best Movie for Grownups: Get Out, Lady Bird, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, The Shape of Water and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri • Best Actress: Annette Bening (Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool), Judi Dench (Victoria & Abdul), Salma Hayek (Beatriz at Dinner), Frances McDormand (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) and Meryl Streep (The Post) • Best Actor: Steve Carell (Battle of the Sexes), Daniel Day-Lewis (Phantom Thread), Tom Hanks (The Post), Gary Oldman (Darkest Hour), Denzel Washington (Roman J. Israel, Esq.) • Best Supporting Actress: Holly Hunter (The Big Sick), Allison Janney (I, Tonya), Melissa Leo (Novitiate), Lesley Manville (Phantom Thread), Laurie Metcalf (Lady Bird) • Best Supporting Actor: Willem Dafoe (The Florida Project), Laurence Fishburne (Last Flag Flying), Woody Harrelson (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), Richard Jenkins (The Shape of Water), and Christopher Plummer (All the Money in the World) • Best Director: Kenneth Branagh (Murder on the Orient Express), Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of Water), Reginald Hudlin (Marshall), Ridley Scott (All the Money in the World) and Steven Spielberg (The Post) • Best Screenwriter: Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of Water), James Ivory (Call Me by Your Name), Anthony McCarten (Darkest Hour), Steven Rogers (I, Tonya), Aaron Sorkin (Molly’s Game) • Best Ensemble: Get Out, Girls Trip, Last Flag Flying, Mudbound, Murder on the Orient Express • Best Grownup Love Story: Breathe, Films Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, The Leisure Seeker, Our Souls at Night, The Greatest Showman • Best Intergenerational Film: The Big Sick, The Florida Project, Lady Bird, Marjorie Prime, Wonder • Best Time Capsule: Battle of the Sexes, Darkest Hour, Dunkirk, I, Tonya, The Post • Readers’ Choice Poll: Beauty and the Beast, Dunkirk, Get Out, Girls Trip, Last Flag Flying, Murder on the Orient Express, The Post, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Wonder, Wonder Woman • Best Documentary: Dolores, Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story, I Am Not Your Negro, Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold, Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo • Best Foreign Film: Chavela (Mexico), The Insult (Lebanon), Like Crazy (Italy), A Taxi Driver (South Korea), The Women’s Balcony (Israel)The annual Movies for Grownups Awards raises funds for AARP Foundation, AARP’s affiliated charity, which helps struggling people 50-plus around the country transform their lives through programs, services and vigorous legal advocacy. The Foundation works to increase economic opportunity and social connections to prevent and reduce senior poverty.last_img read more

It was censored even destroyed but Canadians can now see Multiple Maniacs

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment This week the prestigious Criterion Collection unleashed shock comedy director John Waters’ 1970 film Multiple Maniacs on Blu-ray and DVD for its first official release.The underground comedy follows his drag-queen starlet Divine and gang of murderous misfits through a satire of volatile ’60s politics and violence. An assault on good taste and hippie sentiment, the dirty little flick remains one of the filmmaker’s most aggressively outrageous efforts and, for Canadians, the release is particularly special given that Multiple Maniacs is technically still banned from sensitive Canuck eyeballs by our ratings board, as Waters cheerfully recalls.“I submitted it to some sort of Canadian distribution centre for underground movies and then I never heard anything back. Eventually I wrote a letter and got back a receipt from the (Ontario) censor board that said ‘destroyed.’ That’s the best blurb that I’ve ever gotten, but it did infuriate me. That’s real censorship,” the now 70-year-old filmmaker told the Star recently. Advertisement READ MORE Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

Theatre directors look to boost representation of Indigenous artists

first_imgOntario’s Stratford Festival has enlisted a record of more than a dozen Indigenous artists this season, including actors and a voice coach. Reneltta Arluk made history in her Stratford debut as the first Indigenous person to direct at the festival. She helms the “The Breathing Hole,” a Arctic-set exploration of Indigenous history and climate change centred around the 500-year saga of a polar bear. Advertisement “One of the other things that I learned is that one of the founding principles is about hearing everybody, and you’ve got structures that allow everybody to have a voice.” “I think that one of the big questions that we have to ask ourselves as Indigenous theatre artists is: ‘What is Indigenous theatre? What would be an Indigenous production … and how would you define that?’” said Loring, who won the 2009 Governor General’s Award for English Language Drama for the play “Where the Blood Mixes,” which examined the intergenerational effects of the residential school system. “If somebody was doing a production of ‘Macbeth’ and they want to cast Indigenous actors and there’s going to be an Indigenous director, I would say that that is something that we would be interested in programming because it is being presented through the lens of an Indigenous artist or director. TORONTO — As Kevin Loring becomes the first-ever director of Indigenous theatre at the National Arts Centre, he’ll be looking to help blaze a trail in a creative realm where he’s faced his share of roadblocks. “There’s always … also been a biased perception of Indigenous actors that everybody faces once in a while that can be discouraging. It’s not an easy industry. It’s not always easy to stay in this industry and make this your living.” The historic new post is one of several recent moves made by Canadian arts organizations to help bolster opportunities for Indigenous theatre artists. It also arrives at a time when the issues of cultural appropriation and diversity of representation have been on the front burner. Loring is slated to begin his role with the NAC on Oct. 16. The new department’s inaugural season in 2019 and 2020 will coincide with the Ottawa-based performing arts centre’s 50th anniversary. “For a long time, I would only get cast if there was specifically a native person in a role. For some people, it was very hard to see past the racial boundary,” said the award-winning playwright, actor and educator who is a member of the Nlaka’pamux Nation from the Lytton First Nation in British Columbia. Login/Register With: “There are a lot of Indigenous actors coming out of school and getting training and they’re hungry for the work; so I think we’re in for a really exciting time.” Arluk will begin her role as director of Indigenous arts at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity on Nov. 1. She’ll be looking to continue to build on the progress achieved at Stratford by bringing more Indigenous artists into the fold. “There’s an understanding that this culture will bring a different perspective and that that perspective in reconciliation has a sovereignty that needs to be respected, and so we just made space for it. Advertisementcenter_img Keira Loughran, director of Indigenous workshops as part of the Stratford Festival Laboratory, has made a concerted effort to reach out to elders in the surrounding First Nations for input. Advertisement “This is about non-Indigenous and Indigenous organizations working together and that’s creating space and creating opportunity. It’s more than just putting an actor onstage,” said Arluk, who is of Inuvialuit, Dene and Cree descent. “Positions like Kevin has at the NAC and I have at Banff, what we can then do is come in (and say:) ‘Let’s mentor the emerging artists, let’s do master classes. Let’s get more opportunity for the artists that have bigger vision. Let’s fill those spaces in the NAC and the Banff Centre so that when Stratford is asking for more actors and writers and designers we can say: “We’re right here.”‘” Loring has expressed a desire to broaden the reach of the NAC’s Indigenous theatrical offerings beyond Ottawa, proposing Vancouver, Iqaluit, Montreal and Toronto as potential locales for shows. Twitter “Those kind of balancing acts, how do we determine what is what, and what is appropriate for us is telling, it’s going to be a bit of a dance for each specific case. ” Facebook “This was time for us to stop and challenge ourselves on what do we actually know about Indigenous culture? What can we learn from it and how can it affect the work that we do, whether we’re working on Shakespeare, whether we’re creating original Indigenous work?” said Loughran. Like Loughran, he emphasized the desire to hear from the community on how they’d like to see the work of the department evolve. Kevin Loring, the new artistic director of Indigenous theatre at the National Arts Centre, is shown in a handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-National Arts Centre MANDATORY CREDIT LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment By: Lauren La Roselast_img read more