Standard Life buys £230m portfolio for private fund

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Going for gold

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Bright future for the Black Country

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Waiting games

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Out of stock

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Badminton coach Hendry Saputra has COVID-19 symptoms

first_imgPBSI secretary-general Achmad Budiharto confirmed Hendry’s status on Tuesday, saying that his association had taken immediate action according to the procedure as soon as Hendry complained about his health. The PBSI isolated all the individuals who had been in direct contact with the coach and closed the Cipayung training camp in East Jakarta to outsiders.“It’s true that Hendry is now under observation but he still needs to undergo a series of COVID-19 tests. We have received a report from the medical team that Hendry is waiting for a swab test to determine whether he has COVID-19,” Achmad said in a statement, adding that Hendry was currently being treated at PELNI Hospital in West Jakarta.Read also: Athletes find way to cope with boredom during social distancingOne member of the PBSI’s medical team, Octaviani, said the initial symptoms suffered by Hendry included fever, a limp and nausea. The head coach of Indonesia’s men’s singles badminton team Hendry Saputra is showing symptoms of COVID-19.Hendry is among the 24 players, coaches and officials currently undergoing self-quarantine after arriving from the All England tournament last week.The Indonesian Badminton Association (PBSI) said the coach, who directly handles talents such as Anthony Ginting and Jonatan Christie, had complained about his deteriorating health on the seventh day after arriving from England.   “After conducting a CT scan, [we] found spots in his lungs, whereas coach Hendry doesn’t have a history of lung disease. To determine whether he is COVID-19 positive, we have to conduct a swab test, and we are still waiting for that [test],” she said.The PBSI will also report the case to the Badminton World Federation (BWF) through its International Relation division head Bambang Roedyanto, since Hendry was part of the squad deployed to All England.Achmad went on to advise all the players who reside outside the training camp not to visit the headquarters until the end of this week.Read also: Indonesia’s men’s badminton team pulls off Asia Team Championships hat trickThe PBSI’s development and achievement department head Susi Susanti said the training program had been adjusted due to the current situation.“We are continuing to train, but we have adjusted the program with the athletes’ health in mind. We are trying to maintain the performance. The training schedule has been arranged so that not all players train together. We have also advised athletes to keep their distance from one another,” she said.The East Jakarta Health Agency visited the PBSI headquarters in Cipayung to give information regarding the symptoms of COVID-19 and the first treatment that should be given to anyone suspected of having contracted the virus. The agency has also listed people who have been in direct contact with Hendry. Topics :last_img read more

COVID-19: Rights commission urges police not to detain people holding mass gatherings

first_imgTopics : “Placing violators in jail will not improve public health. Thus, I suggest the police make them perform community service related to public health improvement instead, so the public will also benefit from the sanctions,” Choirul told The Jakarta Post on Thursday. “For example, the police could ask the violators to spray disinfectant in public facilities, while still paying attention to [the violators’] health and safety.”His comment comes in the wake of the National Police’s announcement that police would press charges against people who continued to hold mass gatherings after being warned against doing so.National Police spokesperson Insp. Gen. M. Iqbal said people who continued to gather in large numbers could be imprisoned for up to 16 months or fined up to Rp 900,000 (US$56). Those charges, he said, were stipulated in articles 212, 216 and 218 of the Criminal Code.Choirul also said imprisoning violators would cram more people into jails and detention facilities, which would accelerate the spread of the disease, and that fining violators was a better option than detaining them. “Other countries have also imposed fines on those who hold gatherings during the pandemic, so I think the police should implement that,” Choirul said.Previously, a coalition of 11 civil society groups, including Amnesty International Indonesia, the Jakarta Legal Aid Institute and Transparency International Indonesia, questioned the police’s move to press criminal charges against people who still conducted mass gatherings even though the government has yet to formally declare a lockdown in the country.“The central government rejected calls for a lockdown, but the call for people to stay at home has become coercive. This is evident from the use of police force to disband gatherings and the announcement that those who break the [gathering] prohibition could be prosecuted,” it said in a statement.As of Thursday, Indonesia had reported 893 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with 78 deaths. (glh)center_img The National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM) has called on the National Police not to detain people who insist on holding mass gatherings after being warned against doing so during the COVID-19 pandemic.Komnas HAM commissioner Choirul Anam said the commission initially supported the police’s move on maintaining public order during the pandemic, adding that banning mass gatherings for the sake of public health was also stipulated in the Siracusa principles on the limitation of human rights.However, he said placing wrongdoers in jail was not the right decision.last_img read more

Trump, Putin discuss oil price plunge, coronavirus

first_imgSanctions Trump also told Fox he expected Putin would use the call to push for a lifting of US sanctions on Russia.”He’ll probably ask for that,” Trump told Fox News. “He’s been asking that for two years.”Trump did not say what his response would be, noting that he had put sanctions on Russia but adding: “They don’t like that. Frankly we should be able to get along.”Neither the Kremlin nor White House statement mentioned sanctions.The bulk of US sanctions against Russia were imposed over Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in Ukraine and what US investigators say was a concerted attempt to interfere in the 2016 presidential election won by Trump.Last Thursday, Putin told G20 leaders during a conference call that he wanted a moratorium on sanctions as a “matter of life and death” during the global coronavirus outbreak.In the comments Putin did not specify which countries he was talking about but Russia is being hit hard by the economic fallout from coronavirus and the parallel oil price drop.Another point of US-Russian contention is Venezuela, where Washington, supported by dozens of other countries, has been trying unsuccessfully to promote the toppling of leftist strongman Nicholas Maduro. Russia is one of the few countries propping up his government.The White House statement said “President Trump reiterated that the situation in Venezuela is dire, and we all have an interest in seeing a democratic transition to end the ongoing crisis.”The Kremlin statement did not mention Venezuela.Russian state oil company Rosneft said Saturday it is pulling out of Venezuela and argued that US sanctions on a Rosneft subsidiary — imposed as part of Washington’s attempt to cripple the Maduro government’s revenue sources — should now be lifted.However, Russia remains a key partner to Caracas. Both statements reported that the oil market turmoil was discussed, with the White House version stating agreement on the “importance of stability in global energy markets.”The Kremlin version said only that they “exchanged opinions” on oil.Earlier, Trump had said he was going to use the call to raise objections over a Russian-Saudi price war driving down world oil prices and “really hurting” the US energy industry.”This is a fight between Saudi Arabia and Russia… and they both went crazy,” Trump told Fox News in an interview shortly before talking to Putin.  President Donald Trump and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin discussed plunging oil prices and the coronavirus pandemic Monday, as Trump said Moscow is pressing for an end to US sanctions.The two “expressed serious concern regarding the scope of the spread of the coronavirus” and “discussed closer cooperation,” according to a Kremlin statement on what it described as the “lengthy” phone call.The White House said in a separate statement Trump and Putin had “agreed to work closely together through the G20″ against the virus and the economic shock resulting from travel bans and social distancing. ‘Every country does it’ Trump has often resisted punishing Moscow, which denies meddling in US politics, but his hand on imposing sanctions was forced by his own Republican party in Congress, which sees the Putin government as hostile.The warm relationship between Trump and Putin — seen by many Western capitals as an increasingly authoritarian leader responsible for assassinations of opponents at home and abroad — has been a constant source of controversy in the United States.In his Fox interview, Trump dismissed reports that Russia and China are seeking to exploit the coronavirus disruption by planting disinformation aimed at putting the United States in a bad light.”They do it and we do it,” he said, calling The Washington Post newspaper, which recently reported on the issue, “fake.””Every country does it,” he said.Trump then questioned why Russia was considered an enemy by many in the West. As he has often in the past, he again also cast doubt on what was for decades the rock solid transatlantic alliance between the United States and Germany.”I’m not saying they’re babies, I’m not saying they’re perfect. We might discuss that too, by the way. I’m not saying they’re perfect,” he said of the Russians.”But you know they also fought World War II, they lost 50 million people. They were our partner in World War II.”Germany was the enemy and Germany is like this wonderful thing. Well, Germany takes advantage of us on trade for years. They pay far too little in NATO… and now we don’t talk to Russia, we talk to Germany.”center_img Topics : “I never thought I’d be saying that maybe we have to have an oil (prices) increase, because we do,” Trump said.last_img read more

Indonesia’s rehashed climate action commitments ‘not ambitious enough’

first_imgThe international community was supposed to convene again to review its commitments at the 26th session of the UNFCCC Conference of Parties (COP) in Glasgow, Scotland, in November, but the swift and sudden spread of COVID-19 pushed the summit back to 2021.Although most countries including Indonesia are heavily focused on the viral outbreak response, “there is still much to do” in preparation for the next COP meeting next year, said Nur Masripatin, senior adviser to the environment and forestry minister.Nur said the ministry must still prepare an environmental road map document and legal framework, but also help other agencies prepare in accordance with the pledges outlined in the rehashed NDC. She said her office was also preparing the country’s Long-Term Strategy for Low-Carbon Climate Resilience (LTS-LCCR) to target net zero emissions by 2050.Even with a lot on its plate, Nur said the government was expecting progress on some of its NDC target pledges, particularly in the energy sector where the B30 biodiesel mandate was launched. As the recently updated draft of Indonesia’s climate action commitments under the Paris Agreement awaits government approval, activists worry the reworked pledge might not be ambitious enough for one of the world’s largest emitters of greenhouse gases. The Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) is a pledge made under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to cut down on emissions in accordance with the Paris Agreement goals of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.After inviting environmental groups, experts and public officials in February to weigh in on its reworked NDC pledge, Indonesia decided to keep its previous pledge to reduce emissions by 29 percent independently – or 41 percent with international assistance – by 2030, a carbon copy of the target outlined in its first NDC submission in 2016. Under the B30 program, the government will impose the mandatory use of 30 percent oil palm-based blended biodiesel fuel to help lower fossil fuel imports and increase foreign exchange. It is also planning to make 50 percent blended biodiesel fuel mandatory by 2021.The energy sector is poised to become Indonesia’s second-largest contributor of greenhouse gas reductions, making up 11 percent of all targeted reductions after the forestry sector (17.2 percent).Greenpeace Indonesia has criticized the updated NDCs as not ambitious enough, underscoring the decision not to increase the emissions reduction target. Its climate and energy researcher, Dila Isfandari, suggested that any failure to do so would be reflected in more tangible consequences.“Indonesia won’t be able to save its people from the climate crisis [even with the current NDCs]. Even a rise of 1 degree Celsius in global temperatures drastically increased the frequency of hydrometeorological disasters,” Dila told The Jakarta Post.Government data even confirms this trend. According to the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB), the rising trend of natural disasters has continued from year to year, from 1,967 cases in 2014 to 3,721 cases in 2019.According to the Climate Action Tracker, a website that analyzes government climate actions and measures them against the Paris Agreement goals, Indonesia’s current NDCs will be “highly insufficient” as with it global warming would reach 3 to 4 degree Celsius, above the 1.5 degree Celsius threshold.A World Resources Institute study in 2015 suggested that, if Indonesia continues implementing existing measures, its 2030 carbon dioxide emissions from the land use and energy sectors will overshoot the target associated with the country’s unconditional commitment to a 29 percent reduction.“Reducing emissions to meet Indonesia’s conditional target of a 41 percent reduction below business-as-usual levels would require even stronger efforts, including extending the […] forest moratorium, restoring degraded peatland, implementing energy conservation programs, and pursuing mitigation measures for other sectors and gases,” WRI researchers wrote in the study.The ministry was advised not to reduce its emissions reduction target after a public consultation in February with environmental groups and other stakeholders, including the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry.“The important principle is that the updated NDC must progress beyond existing commitments, meaning that we aren’t allowed to lower our ambitions to reduce emissions,” Nur said in a virtual discussion on Monday.Environmental studies scholar Gusti Anshari of Tanjungpura University said that the updated NDCs will, even if approved, require new regulations to be passed before they can be implemented.In the meantime, he said, the government should figure out a way to “attain our NDC target, whether it be mitigation or adaptation”.Topics :last_img read more

Canada’s Trudeau rejects inviting Russia to G7 summit

first_imgTopics : The Kremlin said Monday that Trump had called President Vladimir Putin and discussed his plan to hold a rescheduled G7 “with possible invitation of the leaders of Russia, Australia, India and South Korea.”Trudeau though flatly rejected that prospect.”It’s really important to keep holding these meetings and making sure that we are we are coordinating internationally in this time of crisis,” he said.Russia was expelled from what was previously the G8 in 2014 after invading and seizing Crimea from Ukraine and declaring it part of Russian territory. On Saturday Trump said he would postpone the planned June summit of leaders from the United States, Germany, Britain, Canada, France, Italy and Japan after German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she would not be coming, citing the coronavirus pandemic.Trump said he could try again in September, and invite other countries including Russia to join the meeting.”I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries,” Trump said.He said he would like to invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to join an expanded summit in the fall.center_img Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday rejected Russia’s participation in a coming summit of the G7 nations, despite host US President Donald Trump wanting to invite Moscow.”Russia was excluded from the G7 after it invaded Crimea a number of years ago,” Trudeau told reporters. “Its continued disrespect and flaunting of international rules and norms is why it remains outside of the G7 and will continue to remain out,” he added.last_img read more