Derrick Hall satisfied with Dbacks buying and se

first_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Former Arizona Cardinals receiver Anquan Boldin will call it a career after 14 NFL seasons, ESPN’s Jim Trotter first reported.In a statement, Boldin said he wanted to commit his time to humanitarian work and fight for human rights. He added that his “life’s purpose is bigger than football.” Statement from Anquan Boldin on his decision to retire: pic.twitter.com/z19jekK33R— Jim Trotter (@JimTrotter_NFL) August 21, 2017The news comes as a surprise and three days after Boldin caught a pass for the Buffalo Bills in the team’s preseason game against the Philadelphia Eagles. Top Stories Buffalo Bills’ Anquan Boldin warms up before a preseason NFL football game against the Minnesota Vikings Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jeffrey T. Barnes) The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelocenter_img 8 Comments   Share   Boldin, the 54th overall pick by the Cardinals in the 2003 NFL Draft, is second in Arizona’s record book with 586 receptions, behind Larry Fitzgerald’s 1,125. Additionally, Boldin is fourth in franchise history with 7,520 receiving yards and holds the second spot for most receiving yards in a single game with 217 yards against the Detroit Lions on Sept. 7, 2003 — his first NFL game.The 2003 Offensive Rookie of the Year — he still holds the NFL rookie record with 101 receptions that season — three-time Pro Bowler and one-time Super Bowl champion also won the 2015 Walter Payton Man of the Year Award.He is ninth in NFL history in total receptions (1,076) and 14th in receiving yards (13,779).The 36-year-old spent the first seven years of his professional career suiting up for the Cardinals. He then joined the Baltimore Ravens from 2010-12 before playing for the San Francisco 49ers in 2013-15. Boldin played with the Lions last year. According to Pro Football Focus’ Nathan Jahnke, Boldin recorded 3,495 yards after the catch. That ranks third, behind Wes Welker and Fitzgerald. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Review Plantbased diets associated with better cardiovascular health

first_img Reduces the risk of death from cardiovascular disease by 40 percent. Reduces the risk of coronary heart disease by 40 percent. Fully or partially opens blocked arteries in up to 91 percent of patients. Reduces the risk of hypertension by 34 percent. Is associated with 29 mg/dL and 23 mg/dL lower total cholesterol and LDL-C levels, respectively, compared with non-vegetarian diets. Is associated with weight loss. May 30 2018Vegetarian, especially vegan, diets are associated with better cardiovascular health, according to a new review published in the journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.Researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine looked at multiple clinical trials and observational studies and found strong and consistent evidence that plant-based dietary patterns can prevent and reverse atherosclerosis and decrease other markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, including blood pressure, blood lipids, and weight.The review found that a plant-based diet: Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymoma”A plant-based diet has the power to not only prevent heart disease, but also manage and sometimes even reverse it–something no drug has ever done,” says study author Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D., Physicians Committee director of clinical research.The review notes that a healthy diet and lifestyle reduces the risk for a heart attack by 81-94 percent, while medications can only reduce the risk by 20-30 percent.Plant-based diets benefit heart health because they’re rich in fiber and phytonutrients–like carotenoids, anthocyanins, and lycopene–which reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. Animal products are packed with saturated fat, cholesterol, heme iron, and environmental pollutants and can harm heart health.”Heart disease is the world’s leading cause of death. This study proves it doesn’t have to be,” says Dr. Kahleova.Around the globe, cardiovascular disease is responsible for 46 percent of non-communicable disease deaths, or 17.5 million deaths a year.Source: http://www.pcrm.org/last_img read more