Charles O’Regan, executive director at FMS, dies at 62

first_imgCharles “Chuck” Patrick O’Regan, executive director of operations for Facilities Management Services, died on March 9. He was 62.O’Regan oversaw approximately 320 employees in operations and maintenance for the University Park and Health Sciences campuses. His more than 36 years at USC began with a senior electrician position, and included leadership roles such as electric shop foreman, construction manager and associate director of Operations and Maintenance. As executive director of operations, O’Regan implemented a Zone Maintenance program and developed a Pay for Skills program to allow tradespeople and technicians to increase their salaries through training and skill assessments.O’Regan was born in Park River, North Dakota, and studied electrical technology at Valley City State College in North Dakota. He served in the U.S. Army from 1969 to 1970, stationed in Korea, and then received an associate’s degree in electrical engineering from Long Beach City College. Before working for the university, he worked for the Long Beach City School District and local contracting firms in the Long Beach area.O’Regan was also known for his love of golf and served as President of the Board at the Candlewood Country Club in Whittier.Operations and Management Project Manager Greg Desario said his 18 years working with O’Regan involved frequent travel around the country, where the two often joked with each other.“He always knew how to pack, and I didn’t understand how he could get all his clothes into one bag,” Desario said. “I used to joke with him about his clothes being little.”Desario stressed O’Regan’s dedication to the university, even when he was stressed or tired.Whenever O’Regan traveled, he had to change chain-of-command notification in case of an emergency at USC. When Desario and O’Regan went on a Thursday through Saturday trip to Las Vegas  because O’Regan wanted to recharge and relax, Desario found out O’Regan had told the university to resume his notification position as soon as he came back to Los Angeles late Saturday night. Desario  then asked O’Regan why he  didn’t wait until Monday.“He said, ‘Greg, people find comfort in knowing that I am here,’” Desario said. “I never really understood how true that was until he was gone.”Desario said there’s a somber mood in the FMS office without O’Regan and that he feels the absence.“We would go and have dinner if we were staying late or had a function in the evening,” Desario said. “Before his memorial service, I was getting ready to pack up and grab some dinner so I looked over at his office door and wondered if he’s ready to go.”Robert Cuthill, a zone supervisor, said it was an honor to work for O’Regan for 16 years.“Anybody would be fortunate to have worked for Chuck. There aren’t a lot of people like him,” Cuthill said. “He never made you feel like he was your boss. You wanted to get things done because it was him.”Cuthill said O’Regan was supportive of all his staff, and his effort to be a friend and a co-worker put him at ease.“He got me through my divorce and when my house burned down,” Cuthill said. “I was a wreck and he stepped in and helped me through it.”While Cuthill stressed the skill and dedication of all FMS management, he said O’Regan was the heart and soul of the department.“In FMS, the managers and directors are great and you can see where it comes from,” Cuthill said. “You don’t have that without someone special like Chuck.”He said O’Regan’s hard work inspired others to do their best, which helped everyone in the university.“If something needed to be done, he’d step in and make sure it happened. Chuck was dedicated to this school and put his all into it,” Cuthill said. “That’s why everyone throughout the university loved him.”Vilma Perez, his assistant, said O’Regan was like a big brother during the 15 years she worked with him.“He was always there to listen to you, even if it was a small little story,” Perez said. “He was all ears all the time.”She said his positive energy inspired her. When she asked him how he was doing, he would say, “I’m doing good with the joy of being here.”At the end of the day, Perez said O’Regan made her laugh with the way he said goodbye: “Elvis is leaving the building.”O’Regan is survived by his wife of 26 years, Melanie, his daughters Amy Salter, Janis Lake, Heather Wilson and Whitney, and his son, Ryan, as well as his eight grandchildren: Samantha, Madison, Laney, Travis, Charlie, Grant, Jack and Lucy. He was the youngest of three, survived by his brother James O’Regan of Owatanna, Minn., and his sister, Mary Wickes of Bismarck, N.D. FMS plans to hold a memorial service for the USC community in the near future.last_img read more

Grinding Gears: Olympics show why we love sports

first_imgEric He | Daily TrojanThe great thing about sports is that the best moments come when you least expect them. Nowhere is that notion more apparent than the Olympics, where there are thousands of athletes, most of whom are relatively unknown and competing in niche sports. This is where historic moments become legendary — not because of the starpower of the athletes, but because the moment was so powerful that it quite simply cannot be forgotten.The Winter Games in PyeongChang, South Korea have produced a few of these moments thus far, but two of them will be etched in stone forever: Last Saturday, when a snowboarder won a gold medal in a skiing event, and Wednesday, when the United States women claimed gold in cross-country skiing for the first time in history, pulling off an incredible upset in a stacked field of winter sports giants.These moments were neither scripted nor predicted. The athletes were not hyped up to be gold medal favorites, like household names Shaun White and Mikaela Shiffrin. Nobody outside of people in their respective sports knew who they were before they competed. But by the time they crossed the finish line, Ester Ledecka, Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall would soon become household names themselves.Ledecka is a snowboarder from the Czech Republic, and her story is one straight out of a movie. She entered the super-G, an alpine skiing event, and reportedly borrowed someone else’s skis to compete. Let me reiterate: This was a snowboarder, competing in a skiing event — in the Olympics, no less.Ledecka was the 26th racer to go down the course, so by the time her turn came, the winner had all but been decided. On the world stage, the commentator had essentially declared Austria’s Anna Veith — the defending champion in the event — the winner, “barring something exceptional.” Well, the exceptional happened. At the first speed marker, she was 0.03 seconds back of Veith. But she was cruising, hitting the right speeds, taking the perfect angles. By the time she hit the third marker — between which the camera repeatedly showed Veith hugging her family, celebrating the presumed gold — Ledecka was in the lead by 0.04 seconds. And as she sped down the home stretch and touched the line, her time flashed on the screen: She had won, by a hundredth of a second. Ledecka’s reaction was priceless, because she didn’t have one. She stared straight ahead, speechless, so stunned that the cameraman had to tell her that she had won.“No,” she said. “Must be some mistake.” There was no mistake. She entered the field as a massive underdog and came out of it an Olympic champion skier. We all love these David vs. Goliath stories, which is why Americans will love what Diggins and Randall did at the women’s team sprint freestyle race. Before Wednesday, no American female cross country skier had claimed a medal. No American — period — had ever won gold, and the last medal went to Bill Koch in 1976.The odds were stacked against them to end the 42-year drought. They were up against countries like Norway and Sweden, which pump out gold medalists in the Winter Olympics like clockwork. The United States, historically, has not stood a chance at this event.But Diggins and Randall had the race of their lives in a relay event that is as hard to watch as it is to compete in. The terrain is nasty, the hills are steep and it is freezing cold. Yet, as the competitors reached the home stretch up the final hill, Diggins was in third, close behind Sweden and Norway. Hills are Diggins’ speciality, and she made her move into second before battling Sweden’s Stina Nilsson in an all-out sprint, winning by 0.19 seconds.Diggins, who placed fifth and sixth, respectively, in her first two events, screamed in joy for a brief second before collapsing in the snow out of exhaustion. Randall, a five-time Olympian competing in her final Games, waited at the finish line and dove on top of Diggins in an embrace. Together, they got up, each with “USA” glittered on their faces, grabbed a big American flag and flashed the widest grins you will ever see.These are the moments that make the Olympics great. We love to watch the so-called favorites. We tune in to see Nathan Chen skate or Chloe Kim snowboard. We’ll be watching when the  gold medal hockey game takes place on the final day of competition on Sunday. But, in the name of the Olympic spirit, let’s recognize the stories that pop up in between, the stories that bring out what we love most about sports.Eric He is a junior majoring in print and digital journalism. His column, “Grinding Gears,” runs Thursdays.last_img read more

Dominican Republic and Haiti sign commercial aviation agreement

first_imgDominican Republic and Haiti sign aviation agreement Commercial flights are to resume between Haiti and neighboring Dominica Republic with new aviation agreement. Aviation agreement The Dominican Republic and Haiti have signed an agreement that will lead to commercial flights between both nations – after 19 years without ties in aviation.MOU signed Last week, a memorandun of understanding (MOU) on Air Services, was signed between Dominican Civil Aviation Board (JAC) president Luis Ernesto Camilo and Haiti Civil Aeronauticsdirector, Olivier Jean.The MOU establishes the legal framework for bilateral trade relations.In a statement, the JAC noted that it’s Dominican Republic’s 58th agreement reached with as many countries, “successfully developing the open air commercial air policy, which will serve as benefits for the region.”The civil aviation authorities of both nations and their respective technical teams signed the agreement after two work meetings leading to the international air services negotiation (ICAN), hosed by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) , to be held later this year in Sri Lanka.Historic momentCamilo, who called the moment “historic,” said he’s satisfied with the MOU which “strengthens the bilateral relations of both States.”Jean stressed the cordiality and openness that prevailed throughout the negotiation process, adding that he looks forward to signing definitive agreement “as soon as possible.”.The talks to reach a similar agreement date as far back as 1992, but didn’t materialize until now.last_img read more

2019 Africa Games: Ghana Athletics Association Salutes Athletes and Supporters

first_img“The Ghana Athletics Association (GAA) congratulates Ghana’s athletes and coaches for the gallant display that saw Team Ghana register among the medal-winning nations at the 2019 African Games. It took so much effort, both before and during the Games, and despite limited resources and the unbelievable stress from various arenas that GAA and the athletes were under in the very recent past.First and foremost, it is the athletes who competed in Rabat who deserve commendation for their performance and general composure even in the Games Village.  Sincere thanks also go to the leadership of our Athlete Commissions (Ghana- and Foreign-based) for their tireless efforts in working with GAA to ensure readiness and a relatively successful outcome at the Games.  As various parties have come out to claim credit for the athletes’ performance, it is imperative to mention that the athletes have been part of the GAA’s grassroots athletics development program that took root almost a decade ago; literally, all of the athletes have participated in local and international meets organized or facilitated by the GAA over the past decade. For this reason, we must also express our gratitude to all those who have supported GAA over the last decade as we have evolved the system that has, over the years, laid the ground for what we saw in Rabat; but for visa issues and injuries, we should not have been surprised to see a few more golden medals.In building the structure, we must thank our members across the regions and in the Ghana Education Service (GES), Ghana University Sports Association (GUSA), and the Ministry of Youth and Sports (and particularly the Office of the Minister). Special mention must be extended to the coaches and technical departments of the various schools, as well as to the non-affiliated, personal coaches who toil day and night to train the athletes. The financial support for the system has primarily come from a number of corporate sponsors, including the Maria Tsakos Foundation, EventPR, rlg, Sea and Shore, Interplast Ghana, Africanus.net, Cocoa from Ghana, Bank of Ghana, Ghana Commercial Bank, and Just Because Fitness, as well as a host of private individuals. We salute them all and hope that they see these victories as theirs.For the 2019 African Games, we are also grateful to the team’s coaches who were in Rabat, and Team Athletics’ leader at the Games, Mr. Bawah Fuseini, who also doubles as the Chief Executive Officer (Secretary General) for both the GAA and the Confederation of African Athletics Association (CAA) Zone II board. As our attention shifts to the 2019 World Championships where both our men’s and women’s relay teams register in the Top-16 in the World but where we also have individual automatic qualifiers like Joseph Paul Amoah, Nadia Eke, and Josephine Anokye, as well as five others who might get the nod when the qualification deadline expires next week, we must specifically acknowledge the $3,430 we received from Just Because Fitness (JBF) and $4,913 advanced from an unnamed individual to enable the women’s team attend the Doha qualifiers at the IAAF World Relays in Japan.” The Ghana Athletics Association has issued a statement expressing its gratitude to the members of the athletics team that excelled during the 2019 African Games in Morocco and the various entities and individuals who played various roles in the success of the team and the general development of the sport in the country.The athletics team gave Ghana four medals in total during the games.The men’s 4×100 relay team won gold, Rose Yeboah won gold in the women’s high jump while Deborah Acquah picked up a silver medal in the women’s long jump and Grace Obour won bronze in the women’s 400m.Below is the statement from the GAA:last_img read more

Shohei Ohtani hits for the cycle in Angels’ victory over Rays

first_imgTyler Skaggs picked up the victory, allowing three runs in five innings, with his outing interrupted by a 36-minute power outage in the fourth inning. The outage was the result of a fire at a nearby substation.Noé Ramírez followed Skaggs to the mound and pitched 2-2/3 scoreless innings. Justin Anderson finished the eighth and Cam Bedrosian worked the ninth, allowing the Angels to rest Ty Buttrey and Hansel Robles for another day after they each handled heavy workloads on Monday and Tuesday.The bullpen’s work ensured that Ohtani’s big day would come in a victory.“He’s starting to lock it in,” Skaggs said. “It’s really exciting. He’s looking like he’s the Ohtani of last year, and that’s really special.”Ohtani missed the first five weeks of the season because of his rehab from Tommy John surgery. Without a true spring training, Ohtani hit .225 in his first 22 games.Since then, though, he’s hit .438 with five homers in his last nine games. Even more impressive, he has done more damage lately against lefties. His homer, double and triple were all against lefty Ryan Yarbrough.“I’m seeing the ball better against lefties, having a good approach,” Ohtani said. “The results are starting to get up there, but I’m feeling good about the process also. I think we’re heading in the right direction.”In the first inning, Ohtani got the Angels on the board with a three-run homer that barely cleared the fence in left-center. He drove a double into the gap in left-center in the third inning. Then he yanked a triple into the right field corner in the fifth, getting the three toughest pieces of the cycle out of the way in his first three trips.Then the buzz began in the dugout.“People were talking about it,” Manager Brad Ausmus said. “It’s not like a no-hitter where no one mentions it.”When Ohtani came to the plate in the seventh, he was facing right-hander Hunter Wood. The Rays were playing an extreme shift against Ohtani, even with no strikes giving him a bunt single down the third base line if he chose to take it. Ohtani swung away and laced a 3-and-2 pitch into shallow center, completing his cycle.Besides Ohtani and Trout, five other Angels have hit for the cycle. Jim Fregosi did it twice.It was the first cycle of Ohtani’s career, including his five years in Japan.“In order to hit for the cycle you need some power to hit the home run and some speed to accomplish the triple,” Ohtani said. “To be able to do it at the major league level at this stage you need a lot of confidence. The important thing now is to continue this tomorrow.”As Ohtani has continued to hit at the major league level, he has continued to prove that he’s more than just a hitter with power, which is what many – including his manager – thought when he came from Japan last year.“If you go back to spring training of 2018 when he arrived, I knew the power was there,” said Ausmus, who was a special assistant in the Angels’ front office last spring. “He had as much power as any hitter I’ve seen. The consistent hitting I wasn’t sure about. He completely proved me wrong in that sense. I thought he’d hit, but I didn’t think he’d hit like this.”Box score “Simply very happy that I was able to accomplish this,” Ohtani said though his interpreter. “There’s been so many other great Japanese players that have come before me. Being the first one to accomplish it (makes me) really happy and it makes for a lot of confidence down the road.”Ohtani hit a three-run homer in the first, a double in the third, a triple in the fifth and a single in the seventh, becoming the first Angel since Mike Trout in 2013 to hit for the cycle.“He got the three hardest ones out of the way,” said Trout, who homered in his last at-bat when he hit for the cycle. “I’m just happy for him. He was excited. I was excited. The whole team.”Ohtani said his teammates gave a beer shower to both him and interpreter Ippei Mizuhara, just as they had after he picked up his first victory as a pitcher last year.In all, he provided four of the Angels’ six hits as they won their third straight game. Albert Pujols’ hit a two-run homer, which was also a milestone. He became the sixth player ever to have 200 homers with multiple teams. PreviousLos Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17), of Japan, celebrates with teammates in the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Ohtani hit for the cycle in the game. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)The Angels’ Cesar Puello reacts after getting hit with a pitch by the Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the first inning of Thursday’s game in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Tyler Skaggs #45 of the Los Angeles Angels throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Ryan Yarbrough #48 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels slides in safely with a double in the third inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols watches his two-run home run off Tampa Bay Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Ryan Yarbrough walks around the mound as Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, rear, runs around the bases after his two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols (5) bows as he shakes hands with Shohei Ohtani (17), of Japan, after Pujols hit a two-run home run off Tampa Bay Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Albert Pujols #5 of the Los Angeles Angels celebrates a two-run home run with Cesar Puello #48 in the fifth inning of a baseball game at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, watches his triple off Tampa Bay Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Catching for the Rays is Mike Zunino. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, runs to first with a triple off Tampa Bay Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels is greeted by Mike Trout #27 after his three-run home run in the first inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels, center, is congratulated on his three-run home run by Tommy La Stella #9 and Mike Trout #27 in the first inning of a baseball game at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Luis Rengifo #4 of the Los Angeles Angels fields a ground ball in the first inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Members of the Los Angeles Angels, including Mike Trout #27 and Albert Pujols #5 talks after the power went out in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)ST. PETERSBURG, FL – JUNE 13: Members of the Los Angeles Angels, including Mike Trout #27 and Kole Calhoun #56 talk with security after power went out in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on June 13, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)Tampa Bay Rays first base coach Ozzie Timmons (30) and left fielder Guillermo Heredia sit outside the dugout after a power failure during the fourth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. A power substation in downtown St. Petersburg was struck by lightning. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs flips the ball to first in time to get Tampa Bay Rays’ Travis d’Arnaud out during the fifth inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17), of Japan, connects for a single off Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Hunter Wood to complete the cycle during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, hits a three-run home run off Tampa Bay Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the first inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, lines a single off Tampa Bay Rays’ Hunter Wood to complete the cycle, during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Tampa Bay Rays during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, celebrates with first base coach Jesus Feliciano after his single off Tampa Bay Rays’ Hunter Wood, completing the cycle during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17), of Japan, celebrates with teammates in the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday, June 13, 2019, in St. Petersburg, Fla. Ohtani hit for the cycle in the game. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)The Angels’ Cesar Puello reacts after getting hit with a pitch by the Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the first inning of Thursday’s game in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)NextShow Caption1 of 23The Angels’ Cesar Puello reacts after getting hit with a pitch by the Rays’ Ryan Yarbrough during the first inning of Thursday’s game in St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)ExpandST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — As talk of a cycle was circulating in the Angels dugout late in their 5-3 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays on Thursday, Shohei Ohtani didn’t seem interested in settling for the last piece he needed: a single.During a conversation with David Fletcher in the batting cage after he had a homer, a double and a triple, Ohtani said: “No, I want another homer.”“I don’t think he was trying to hit a single,” Fletcher said. “He was definitely trying to hit a homer, if you watch the at-bat. But I’m glad he got the single.”It was a single that made history, as Ohtani became the first Japanese-born player to hit for the cycle in the majors.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Sumner County Court Docket: August 16, 2013 report

first_img by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following are a list of criminal court complaints recently filed by the Sumner County Attorney’s office.These are formal charges introduced into the Sumner County District Court system. The suspects listed in the complaint have not been tried by a judge or jury. All citizens are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. •••••Paul Eugene Osborne, Jr., born in 1981, of South C, Wellington was charged with distribution of methamphetamine, a Level 3 drug felony; and unlawful use of drug paraphernalia to facilitate drug sale, a level 5 drug felony; distribution of methamphetamine, a level 4 drug felony; and conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, a level 3 drug felony.On March 21, 2013, Osborne is accused of selling 1.5 grams of meth in a jewelry bag from his car seat in the Conoco Jump Start parking lot.On March 20, 2013, Osborne is also accused of assisting Curtis Everhart in selling about .17 grams of meth to a third person in a room at the Steakhouse Motel.•••••Andrew Finch, born in 1989, of Wichita and Joseph Bussart, Jr., born in 1991, of Wichita were charged with battery, a Class B misdemeanor; and disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor.Finch and Bussart are accused of punching each other while arguing over a card game on July 26, while using insulting provoking words during the physical confrontation.Bussart pled guilty to battery on Aug. 9. He was sentenced to 90 days in county jail consecutive to Sedgwick County cases and ordered to attend anger management counseling at CSO’s discretion. Finch went to court on Aug. 15 for a disposition.•••••Tyler Hockenbury, born in 1959, of Argonia was charged with theft, a Class A misdemeanor; and violation of protective order, a Class A misdemeanor.Hockenbury is accused of stealing a bicycle worth about $350 on July 3, 2013. He also was charged for violating a Sumner County protection from abuse order after he contacted a person that he was prohibited by law from contacting.•••••Wesley Hudson, born in 1957, of Salina Kansas was charged with theft, a Class A misdemeanor; possession of narcotics, a level 5 drug felony; traffic in contraband in penal institution, a level 6 felony; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.At the Kansas Star Casino on July 28, 2013, Hudson is accused of taking chips from another person who got up to use the restroom while leaving the chips on the table. Hudson allegedly mixed the person’s chips up with his own while playing blackjack.He was later allegedly found to have methamphetamine in a baggie, a narcotic drug at the Sumner County Jail, and attempted to introduce it into the correctional facility without the permission of Sheriff Darren Chambers and jail administrator Steven Porter.Hudson is to have a disposition at Sumner County District Court on Aug. 29.•••••Jesse Burnett, born in 1991, of Conway Springs was charged with two counts of battery, Class B misdemeanors.Burnett is accused of striking another family member during an argument when he was allegedly intoxicated. He then is accused of pushing an elderly family member when she tried to break up the fight. He had a court disposition on Aug. 15.•••••Victoria Jay, born in 1993, of Derby was charged with failure to dim lights; possessing marijuana, a class A misdemeanor; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.On July 27, Jay is accused of operating a motor vehicle west on U.S. 166 in Sumner County and failing to dim her lights while approaching a vehicle driven by a Sumner County Sheriff deputy.It was allegedly discovered that she had a small quantity of marijuana in a blue glass pipe elsewhere in the vehicle.•••••Joseph McMahan, born in 1991, of Belle Plaine was charged with possession of methamphetamine, a level 5 drug felony; possession of marijuana (second offense), a level 5 drug felony; contributing to a child’s misconduct or deprivation, a Class A misdemeanor; two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanors; and three counts of transporting an open container, unclassified misdemeanors.On July 25, McMahan is accused of having meth and marijuana inside a baggie in his white -colored car. He is also accused of encouraging a child under 18 to possess marijuana.He also allegedly had rolling paper, plastic baggies, and three alcoholic beverages in the vehicle.McMahan will hold a court disposition on Sept. 5.•••••Ruben Salazar, born in 1968, of Sumner County Jail was charged with battery against a law enforcement officer; a level 5 felony.Salazar is accused of willfully and intentionally causing physical contact with a Sheriff Deputy in a rude, insulting or angry manner while the deputy was engaged in the performance of his duty at the county jail facility.•••••James Charles Dick, born in 1974, of Wellington was charged with burglary of a dwelling, a level 7 person felony; and theft, a class A misdemeanor under a value of less than $1,000.Dick is accused of entering  a single wide trailer located at 420 East Maple in Wellington on July 27 and taking a 43 inch Samsung Plasma television.•••••Miguel Ray Machado, born in 1986, of Wichita was charged with possession of marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a class A misdemeanor.Machado is accused of possessing marijuana in a Marlboro box to store.•••••Jenny Marquez, born in 1987, of Omaha, Neb. was charged with  possession of marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.•••••Justin Ford, born in 1973, of Derby was charged with theft, a level 9 felony.Ford is accused of getting unauthorized control over a 2013 White Cadillac Escalade valued more than $1,000 on Aug. 5.•••••Scott Stout, born in 1978, of Tonkawa, Okla. was charged with possession of marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.•••••Darcy Diane Dickover, born in Tonkawa, Okla. was charged with possession of marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor; possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor; no current registration; and failure to provide proof of insurance, a Class B misdemeanor.On July 21, Dickover was accused of having marijuana and a baggie after being stopped by Wellington Police on 15th Street.•••••Patrick Bennett, born in 1988, of Wellington was charged with two counts of criminal threat, level 9 felonies; harassment by telecommunication device, a Class A misdemeanor; violation of a protective order, a Class A misdemeanor; and theft, a Class A misdemeanor.Bennett is accused of sending a text message to someone threatening to burn her house down. He also allegedly violated a protection from abuse order to see her. He also then allegedly threatened the alleged victim that he would hurt her if she called the police. He then is accused of taking the victim’s class ring and engagement ring.•••••Curtis Redmond, born in 1993, of Ponca City, Okla. was charged with burglary of a non-dwelling, a level 7 felony.Redford is accused of entering Main Street Car Wash with intent to commit a theft therein.•••••Robert Kidder, born in 1983, of Winfield and David Hunter II, born in 1969, who is homeless and currently in Sumner County jail were charged with battery, a Class B misdemeanor; and disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor.Kidder and Hunter were accused of brawling and using angry words against each other on Aug. 8.•••••Johnny Jackson, born in 1967, of Arkansas City and Walter Jackson, born in 1978, of Ponca City, Okla. were charged with burglary of a non-dwelling, a level 7 felony; theft, a class A misdemeanor; and criminal damage to property, a level 9 felony.The Jacksons are accused of entering Main Street Car Wash with intent to commit a theft within. They allegedly took various coins and U.S. Currency less than $1,000. They are also accused of damaging the change machine, door and other property to obtain the coins.•••••John Sinkler, born in 1966, of Wichita and Jennifer Calvert-Perkins, born in 1975, of Wichita were charged with domestic battery, a Class B misdemeanor; and disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor.Sinkler is accused of throwing a drink on Calvert-Perkins and hitting her on the side of the head. Calvert-Perkins is accused of throwing a drink on him. Both were accused of using fighting words or engaging in noisy conduct tending to arouse, alarm, anger or resentment of others.•••••Dean Rogers, born in 1967, was charged with possession of methamphetamine, a level 5 drug felony; two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanors; and criminal trespass, class B misdemeanors.Rogers is accused of possessing meth inside a baggie and a glass pipe on August 6 at the Kansas Star Casino, which he was not authorized of entering.last_img read more

Mason City council approves funding for North Iowa Corridor small business program

first_imgMASON CITY — The City Council in Mason City last night approved making a $300,000 financial allocation to the North Iowa Corridor Economic Development Corporation’s “Small Business Recovery & Continuity Fund”. The fund will help small, independently-owned businesses with less than 25 employees that are suffering during the public health emergency with grants up to $5000. About 250 businesses filed paperwork for the program’s pre-application process. North Iowa Corridor CEO Chad Schreck says those who have not received funding from state or federal programs will get first priority in the selection process.  “One of the standards that we’re looking at on that front would be if somebody’s received $5,000 in grant-type funding or more from outside sources, they’ll obviously be second priority to those that have not been able to receive funding from outside the county. That’s one way that we’re going to kind of whittle that pool down a little bit and really try to hit those folks that have the highest level of need that haven’t been able to address it elsewhere.”Schreck says some businesses who filled out the pre-application have decided not to fill out the full application since they’ve already received some type of funding. “We have had some that have found out since they did the pre-application they did receive funding either from the state or from the federal level and have decided not to pursue our fund, which we certainly appreciate.” Councilman John Jaszewski says he’s pleased the city is involved in the program.  “I think by the number of applications that we received, it’s obviously very evident that this was a much-needed program, and I’m just really pleased that we were able to do something for our local businesses that maybe some other way they could not get the funding. I’m really happy about this program and I think it’s a big plus for the whole community and the whole area.” The Clear Lake City Council on Monday night approved $100,000 for the program, while the Cerro Gordo County Board of Supervisors earlier this month also approved a $100,000 allocation. Other private donations to the fund are being accepted.last_img read more

Two women arrested for trafficking girls to pay bond for family member

first_imgTwo women have been sentenced, and a man already in jail is facing additional charges, after officials found that the group trafficked underage girls in an attempt to raise money for the man’s bail.The incident occurred in the Western District of North Carolina.According to the report, Zerrell Fuentes, who had been jailed in a hit-and-run case, arranged for his wife Brianna Leshay Wright and his mother Tanya Fuentes to raise money on his behalf by trafficking young girls. Officials say Fuentes reportedly recruited the girls while he was in jail and his wife and mother executed the plan.Prosecutors say Zerrell contacted the three girls via phone and arranged for the girls to meet his wife and mother. Fuentes drove the girls to an area in Myrtle Beach and paid for their lodging. While Wright arranged for them to meet clients and posted advertisements on the internet.The U.S. Attorney’s Office announced sentences for both women Monday. Wright was sentenced to 10 years in prison for sex trafficking a minor, while Fuentes was been sentenced to two years for conspiracy.last_img read more

MMA on the rise as crowds witness thrilling event in Bangkok

first_imgA spectacular MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) event was held in Bangkok on Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Insanity Nightclub on Sukhumvit Road:Cambodia’s Thai Rithy takes on Filipino Richard Corminal at the MMA fight night in Bangkok, Saturday, September 10. (Photo/Singaporemaven)Fight promoters Full Metal Dojo also announced that, as part of their support of the new Thailand Mixed Martial Arts Federation (TMMAF), they will be holding an all-amateur tournament for Thai MMA fighters across four regions of Thailand from January next year, under the banner – Made in Thailand.The winners in the various weight categories will then represent Thailand at the prestigious 2017 International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF) World Championships, part of the UFC’s annual International Fight Week in Las Vegas.In Bangkok, a 10-fight card featured some of the toughest, most closely-fought MMA wars of attrition ever seen in the Thai capital. In the main event, American Emilio Utturio (8-4) edged a split decision win over Brazilian Daniel Hortegas (3-3) in a blood, sweat and tears contest.  Utturio proved his well-rounded skills against the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt practitioner and finished in the ascendancy, although both fighters showed incredible heart to keep up the frenetic pace.But the fight-of-the-night saw Iran’s Masoud Ranjbar (3-0) from AKA Thailand, Phuket, force a verbal tap-out of the promising British brawler Jamie Sloane (6-3), who dominated the Iranian with his boxing, but was worn down and unable to continue at the end of the second round.  This was a memorable battle, where Sloane had Ranjbar in all kinds of trouble, almost knocked-out on his feet, but the courageous Iranian found the strength to land crucial take-downs and fatal ground-and-pound, which eventually exhausted the brave Brit.Another man who was dominant on the feet, but lost the war on the ground was the ever-popular 18-year old Cambodian Thai Rithy (5-2) who scored some heavy bombs on Filipino Richard Corminal (4-1), but was impressively taken down and finished via ground-and-pound in round two.  Both fighters showed their fighting heart, swinging wild punches at each other, yet the grappling advantage was held by Corminal as he proved his worth against fan favourite Rithy, also winning some new fans of his own.FMD founder and host, Jon Nutt, saved the day by stepping into the cage on one day’s notice as a last minute stand-in, and had a brief, but memorable minute in the Dojo with ripped Brazilian heavyweight Marcelo Tenorio (4-1), as they traded kicks and punches before Tenorio forced Nutt to tap-out via head-lock.Elsewhere, a performance-of-the-night contender was Bangkok’s Settawut “Ben Ten” Nemthanorm, who landed a thunderous head-kick to Chiang Mai’s Nat Natchayangkul in the first round, before sinking in a textbook rear-naked choke, forcing the tap-out in the second stanza.Dominant displays came from two high-flying Thai prospects who were both trained up in the Muay Thai tradition, before transitioning into MMA, and now fighting in both disciplines.  Thanonsaklek “Top Noi” TigerMuayThai (2-1) notched his second win in the Dojo with a swift and brutal win over Anton Larsson (2-1).  Yodkaikaew “Y2K” Fairtex (3-1) from Fairtex Gym, Pattaya, also destroyed Jirawat “Machida” Anujai with his superior stand-up skills.last_img read more

Spring Arts Walk Registration Now Open

first_imgFacebook14Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The City of OlympiaRegistration forms for artists and downtown businesses participating in Arts Walk XLIX are now available:In person at The Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW,Online at olympiawa.gov/artswalkOr by calling Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation at 360.753.8380Early Bird registration deadline is Saturday, February 6th, and the standard registration deadline is Saturday, February 13, 2016. Sponsored by Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation and the Olympia Arts Commission, Arts Walk attracts over 15,000 visitors to celebrate the arts in downtown Olympia. Spring Arts Walk dates are Friday, April 22, 5-10pm, and Saturday, April 23, 12-8pm.The spring event includes the Procession of the Species Celebration, more information at www.procession.orglast_img read more