Paul George hits winner, scores 45 as Thunder beat Jazz in 2OT

first_imgView comments LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Still in the hunt Oklahoma City Thunder forwards Paul George (13) and Jerami Grant (9) celebrate after George hit a shot with less than a second left in the second overtime of an NBA basketball game against the Utah Jazz in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. The Thunder won 148-147. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)OKLAHOMA CITY — Paul George floated in a basket with less than a second remaining in double-overtime, capping a 45-point night with the winning shot in the Oklahoma City Thunder’s 148-147 victory over the Utah Jazz on Friday.George dribbled out the final seconds before driving between two defenders and floating in a shot with 0.8 seconds left. Kyle Korver got off a desperate 3 for Utah, but it went long as the buzzer sounded.ADVERTISEMENT Thunder: Oklahoma City scored at least 115 points for the 19th straight game, passing the Cincinnati Royals for the second longest such streak in NBA history. The Denver Nuggets hold the record with 22 straight. … Oklahoma City swept the season series against Utah. … The Thunder have won seven straight at home.WELCOME TO THE THUNDERDOMEMarkieff Morris received a rousing round of applause when he made his first appearance on the court for the Thunder. Morris, signed as a free agent Wednesday, checked in 3 1/2 minutes into the first quarter after Grant picked up two quick fouls, but was ineffective in his first stint. He played the rest of the quarter without taking a shot or grabbing a rebound, picking up two fouls of his own. He played 17 minutes, missed his only shot and had two assists.UP NEXTJazz: Hosts Dallas on Saturday night.Thunder: Hosts Sacramento on Saturday night.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Steven Adams played a game-high 47 minutes for Oklahoma City, returning from a pre-All-Star break ankle injury to score 16 points and grab 10 rebounds to go along with five steals.Derek Favors hit his first 10 shots, finishing with 24 points and 11 rebounds for Utah. Gobert had 26 points and 16 rebounds for the Jazz.The teams were physical throughout. Westbrook got a flagrant foul for crashing into Gobert while defending a layup, and there was a fracas late in the first half after Jae Crowder fouled the Thunder’s Dennis Schroder.TIP-INSJazz: It was the first time Utah had scored more than 140 points in a game in seven years and the first time they had allowed more than 140 points since 2009.ADVERTISEMENT NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers PLAY LIST 01:48NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers05:05SEA Games 2019: Rubilen Amit finally beats Chezka Centeno for 9-ball gold (HIGHLIGHTS)00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Russell Westbrook added 43 points, 15 rebounds and eight assists, helping Oklahoma City overcome 38 points from Donovan Mitchell. Westbrook fouled out with 1:09 left in the first overtime, ending his NBA streak of 11 consecutive games with a triple-double.The game went to overtime after the Thunder’s Jerami Grant completed a tying three-point play, then blocked Mitchells shot at the other end. Grant had 18 points.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsIn the first overtime, Abdel Nader hit a 3-pointer to give the Thunder a 139-137 lead in the final minute after Westbrook and Terrance Ferguson had fouled out. Utah’s Rudy Gobert tipped in the tying basket with 33.7 seconds left, and George and Mitchell eached missed jumpers in the closing seconds.Gobert hit two free throws with 1:10 left in the second overtime for a 147-146 lead, but Utah went cold from there. Mitchell’s driving shot off the glass missed the rim, and Joe Ingles missed on a long 3-point try as the shot clock expired with 13.2 seconds left. MOST READlast_img read more

KaTropa bust Painters’ run

first_imgPBA IMAGESANTIPOLO CITY—Playing its first game in 25 days, TNT looked the sharper team against streaking Rain or Shine, carving out a 100-92 decision in Sunday’s PBA Philippine Cup action at Ynares Center here.Even without its marksman, national team mainstay Roger Pogoy, TNT managed to dictate the pace for most of the game. Jayson Castro and Troy Rosario, both fresh from their national team stint, tallied 20 points each.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title “We’ve been practicing really, really hard during the break,” coach Bong Ravena said in Filipino. “We want our team tofocus on defense and be consistent.”With the help of Jericho Cruz and Ryan Reyes, TNT erected a 17-point lead against the erstwhile coleaders of the tournament. Cruz finished with 15 points while Reyes added 10 more.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsBut Rain or Shine wasn’t the hottest team in the league for nothing—riding into the game on the saddle of a five-game winning streak. And even without star big man Raymond Almazan anchoring the middle, the Elasto Painters weren’t going down without a fight.Veteran James Yap and rookie Jjay Alejandro spearheaded a 17-4 run that pulled the Elasto Painters within four with 33 ticks left to play. Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra MOST READ LATEST STORIES But they eventually ran out of time to complete the comeback.In the other match, Alaska rebounded from big loss by coming out with an even bigger win, shredding crowd-favorite Barangay Ginebra, 104-78.The Aces, still with several key cogs decommissioned by injuries, got strong performances from Chris Banchero, Simon Enciso and a host of role players to tab their third win in five outings.The Kings dropped to 3-3.ADVERTISEMENT Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Abuan rules high jump for third Philippine gold in Isabela Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View commentslast_img read more

Thai playmaker Chanathip Songkrasin raises profile in Japan

first_imgGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In his second season in Japan, the 5-foot-2 (1.58-meter) attacking midfielder scored eight goals, helping Consadole to a fourth-place finish in the top flight — a record high for the club.He was selected to the J-League XI, becoming the first Southeast Asian player to earn the honor.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra FILE – In this Jan. 20, 2019, file photo, Thailand’s midfielder Chanathip Songkrasin controls the ball during the AFC Asian Cup round of 16 soccer match between Thailand and China in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. With soccer booming in Southeast Asia, Chanathip’s move to Japan has been a win-win situation for both the Thai playmaker and the J-League. The 25-year-old Chanathip signed with first-division club Consadole Sapporo in 2017 and has been a hit both on and off the field. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)TOKYO — With soccer booming in Southeast Asia, Chanathip Songkrasin’s move to Japan has been a win-win situation for both the Thai playmaker and the J-League.The 25-year-old Chanathip signed with first-division club Consadole Sapporo in 2017 and has been a hit both on and off the field.ADVERTISEMENT Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Indian Wells: Serena Williams, Simona Halep win; Sloane Stephens ousted Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying View comments Last year, Chanathip’s Thailand teammates Teerasil Dangda and Theerathon Bunmathan played in the J-League with Sanfrecce Hiroshima and Vissel Kobe.Thailand captain Teerasil returned to Muangthong following the completion of his loan deal, but Theerathon is continuing to play in the J-League with Yokohama F Marinos.Newly promoted Oita Trinita, meanwhile, has acquired Thai midfielder Thitipan Puangchan on loan.Chanathip has given the profile of the Japanese league a huge boost in his homeland, where he was a star at Thai powerhouse Muangthong United.Thai TV viewership of J-League broadcasts hit an all-time high in 2017 when a match between Consadole and the J-League’s Kawasaki Frontale drew an estimated 400,000 Thai TV viewers, outperforming a broadcast of popular domestic side Buriram United.The J-League hopes its success in Thailand can be duplicated in other Southeast Asian countries, where broadcasts of the top European leagues dominate ratings.Murai has praised Chanathip for his success with Sapporo and promotion of the league in Thailand.“I was surprised when a video of Chanathip’s first practice in Sapporo attracted 3 million viewers, more than the entire population of Sapporo,” Murai told local media. “He has made a huge impact on the J-League.”While he’s completely focused on helping Sapporo achieve its goals, Chanathip said he’s keeping an open mind about his future prospects, including the possibility of one day playing on soccer’s biggest stage.“If I get a chance to play in Europe, I’d be happy to take on a new challenge,” Chanathip said. “Japanese football is very fast and physical,” Chanathip said in a recent interview. “Players here are very disciplined, so if more Thai players come to Japan, they will be able to learn a lot and become better football players.”While playing in a more competitive league has helped Chanathip raise the level of his game, it has also helped promote the J-League overseas. Nearly 1.5 million people attend soccer matches every year in Thailand and Japanese soccer officials are eager to gain a foothold there. With the recent signings of players such as Andres Iniesta, David Villa and Fernando Torres, the J-League is bidding to raise its international profile in the region after a period when the Chinese Super League grabbed most of the headlines for its record-breaking signings and transfer deals.During the 2017 season, the Chinese authorities introduced a 100 percent tax on the signing of foreign players for a fee of more than $7 million in a move to increase opportunities for young local players. At the same time, the limited on the number of foreign players that could be selected for a game was reduced from four to three for each team.While Chinese soccer appears to be inching back from a foreign influx, the J-League, long considered the most professional competition in the region, is stepping forward.“We want to create interest in our league not only in Japan but in Asia and around the world,” J-League chairman Mitsuru Murai said. “With players like Chanathip we feel we are well on the way to achieving those goals.”Since 2017, the J-League has permitted each team to sign one player from an Asian Football Confederation nation outside of the existing foreign player quota.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title LATEST STORIES MOST READlast_img read more

2Switt’s Grit to Fit

first_imgHis status as being the voice behind a new sound of storytelling composition to come out of Liberia has many citizens wondering, who is 2Switt?Proclaimed by UNMIL radio recently on the Chris Wolo show as having the best Liberian humanitarian track of the year (2013) “Why She Cry” featuring F.A.; LIB LIFE deemed it necessary to catch up with this talented brother and ask him where all of this swag and storytelling flair came from.LIB LIFE: 2Switt, your name is all over Liberia about the contributions that you’re making to the industry. It’s like you fell out of the sky, and we want to know from whence you came.  2Switt: Ha-ha. I came from Gardnersville to be precise, but have been schooling and living in Sierra Leone since I was 8 years old. My father is a Sierra Leonean and that’s why I talk like this. Even though I sound very Sierra Leonean, I’m a Liberian, that’s for sure.LIB LIFE: The track “Why she cry” was not the first track that you’ve done in your lengthy career, so tell us about the other tracks you’ve made.2Switt: I’ve done “Will you be there for me”, “We did it now”, “Thank you Lord” ft Bernice Blackie, “Who dat boy deh” ft DJ Blue and “Party hard” ft Cypha D’King. I have new tracks out, including “I’m sorry” ft Quincy B and “Why she cry”, featuring F.A.LIB LIFE: You have the gift to draw a vivid picture for your audience through your lyrics and story telling. Where did you muster up such creativity?2Switt: I’ve been in music for a very long time, in fact, my father gave me my first recording studio when I was 11 years old. So, I grew up doing music with big musicians in Salone and was known as MID.LIB LIFE: There’s word that you wrote the song that won the president’s writer contest, are you that good of a writer?2Switt: I collaborated with Quincy B and wrote the song that won the president’s competition. I am good at helping to polish people’s songs, but some people feel small when somebody gives them written music here. You should not feel small but bigger in fact because other people writing your tracks can help you to sound different.LIB LIFE: So it’s important to grow in the industry, even if that means taking instruction and being critiqued by other people?2Switt: Yes! I work with people all of the time so I can get the best out of myself. Working with people allows them to tell me where I fall short, if I’m not doing too well. I want you to tell me so I can better myself. This industry is teamwork, tell me where I fall short, and I’ll tell you where you fall short.LIB LIFE: Your accent seems to be the golden treasure in your songs, but do you find it hard having a foreign accent in your own country?2Switt: People get confused that I’m not a Liberian, maybe because I’m supposed to speak “Colo”. Many Liberians don’t know what it takes to grow up in a foreign country. So when they call me foreigner, the pain that adds to that makes me feel bad.LIB LIFE: I can understand. I guess that means there are great big challenges that you have to maneuver around? Being 2Switt’s not easy is it?2Switt: Ha-ha. That’s what brought me back home, something was done to me and I was the victim. My sister asked me to come back home to start fresh. Some people didn’t want to see me at a certain place at a certain time, and that’s what happened to me and how I was the victim.LIB LIFE: With all of the challenges comes champagne and celebration, new things at the end. Tell me, what do you have in store for us this 2014 now that you’ve been rated so high by the show on UNMIL radio?2Switt: Right now I am doing a project with UNMIL and working on 2 to 3 concerts. Next month I will be participating in the East vs. West concert battle in Sierra Leone along with musicians from all over Africa.LIB LIFE: Great. With all of that said, will you be able to remain 2014’s musical prodigy in our steadily growing industry?2Switt: I can assure you that not only in Liberia, but I’m one of the best rappers in Liberia. From what I’ve heard and seen, I know that I am the best storyteller, and will make the heat and be ahead of my game. People just want to hear something different no matter who brings it, and I’m fortunate to be that person. Everybody does Colloquia, and for a change people want to see Liberia differently, and I’m the only person who sounds different right now.LIB LIFE: Before we go, I just want to know if you will be able to maintain how differently you sound now that you are no longer in Sierra Leone?2Switt: I can maintain my accent and have switched my style now to give my fans more than what they heard last year.LIB LIFE: Nice having you here and we look forward to having all of your music and seeing you in concert. Would you like to share anything before we go?2Switt: Oh yeah. No girlfriend, single and definitely looking forward to being with a beautiful Liberian woman. Thought I’d share that about myself. (Laughter) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

REDEEMING LIBERIA FOR LIBERIANS

first_imgYou graduates are redeemers if you become part of an emerging Liberian middle class that we hope will soon arise with confidence and determination and take charge of our economy. …the ultimate purpose of education is to LIBERATE the human mind, spirit and condition. That is how, from faraway Harper, Cape Palmas, where this great institution was first established, to the rural habitat of our legendary Paramount Chief, Madam Suah Koko, it was possible for a poor, barefooted lad from Sinyea, born of unlettered, farming parents, to rise from poverty and deprivation to become the first President of Cuttington University!  I refer to none other than Dr. Henrique F. Tokpa.     Let me congratulate you, Dr. Tokpa, Bishop Hart and the Board of Trustees,  Faculty, Staff and Student Body, for leading this Cuttington through its first decade of existence as a full-fledged University, and maintaining its integrity and prestige as one of the preeminent institutions of higher learning in West Africa!  Let me also congratulate the parents and families and all people of goodwill who have supported these young people graduating today, for your love, commitment and sacrifices that have empowered them to reach this important milestone in their lives, graduating from the great Cuttington University.I would like, too, to highly commend President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Counselor Yvette Chesson Wureh, former Foreign Minister Olubanke King Akerele, the women of Liberia and their international partners for their vision and energy in building on the Cuttington Univerisity campus the Madam Suah Koko Center for Women Empowerment.  It is a fitting tribute to this legendary Liberian woman, and we are happy and proud that it has been erected on our historic and beloved campus!It is also commendable that Cuttington University is doing what a university does—confers upon its tested and accomplished scholars not only undergraduate, but also graduate degrees, first in Education and Theology, now in Business and Health Sciences.Let us redouble our efforts to help Cuttington University forge ahead to establish more Colleges in strategic disciplines that will ensure that Liberia takes the great leap forward in agriculture, agro-industries, business, industry, manufacturing and technology.  Cuttington should lead the way to revive Liberia’s vanishing culture by encouraging and enabling Liberian parents and the schools to teach their children to speak Liberian languages, and learn Liberian history and Liberian culture.  Cuttington must train historians and people of letters, who will write and publish books and literature for our own academic requirements from kindergarten to University level, and put Liberia on the world literary map. How many of you know that Edwin J. Barclay wrote the Lone Star Forever when was only 19 years old? We must begin to develop a Liberian business class that will participate actively in the business sector and the economy.The Government, can make this happen by making it mandatory that ALL  foreign businesses, whose operations are US$50,000 or more, have a credible Liberian partner. But this is not enough. We must know how to partner in our own interest. We have to be clear what is our interest and be focused on it. I had absolutely no clue that the words I had spoken would come so soon to pass.  I was only speaking from my heart, and from my observation of things happening around me.Some of you were yet unborn, but will recall from history that exactly TWELVE DAYS later, on December 24, 1989 Charles Taylor and his National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) crossed the Ivorian border, entered Buutuo, Nimba County and  fired the first shots of their invasion.  This immediately ignited the calamitous civil war that would topple and kill the Liberian dictator Samuel Doe and most of his closest associates.  And because Taylor was himself equally or perhaps even more greedy, corrupt, and unpatriotic, he kept the war going for 14 years, devastating the country’s infrastructure and causing the massacre of over 250,000 people.  Taylor told his ruthless and corrupt associates that they were free to do anything they wished, for his regime would be in power until 2025.  What he, like President Samuel K. Doe, and President William R.Tolbert whom Doe overthrew and brutally murdered—what Taylor did not know was that his own day of reckoning would most certainly come.  Indeed it came, for him, for his son Chuckie and their entire destructive and murderous regime.  Where are they today is a question moot, whose answer is known to us all.This leads me back exactly a century earlier, to 1889, when the man we all know as the Education bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Liberia, the visionary Rt. Rev. Samuel David Ferguson, founded, on February 22, 1989, our esteemed and beloved alma mater, Cuttington College and Divinity School.  It was on that day that Bishop Ferguson laid the cornerstone for the first building, and named it Epiphany Hall—the name that we joyfully and reverently call when we sing our beautiful Cuttington Ode.It is indeed fitting, I believe, that we should recall the great contribution of another Episcopal Bishop, who made a distinctive mark on Cuttington and Liberia—Bishop Bravid W. Harris.  It was he who convinced his friend, President William V.S. Tubman, to agree to transfer Cuttington from Harper, Cape Palmas, Tubman’s own home town, to Suakoko in faraway Bong County.  Bishop Harris broke ground for the new Cuttington in Suakoko on April 17, 1948 and pledged that the rebuilt college would “assist in the molding and development of such fine characters, that those who pass from under our influence will be able to make their constructive contribution to the society of which they are a part.”Permit me, at this juncture, to reflect briefly on the question of power, and how people in different places use it in very different ways.  Jesus Christ, the most powerful person that ever walked this earth, used not one ounce of his power for or on Himself.  As we all know, He used it for good—healing, giving hope and restoring life.A bishop in all ecclesiastical traditions has a lot of power.  But to what use did Bishops Furguson and Harris apply the   power that was available to them? They used power to lay the foundation for the education, enlightenment and training of future generations of Liberians and Africans, to help usher them, their country and their continent, out of the quagmire of ignorance, poverty, disease and underdevelopment. The World Bank and other international financial institutions may advise against this. But we must never forget that Liberia, when most African nations were still colonized, was one of the signatories to the creation of the Brettenwood Institutions, the World Bank, International Monetary Fund and the International Finance Corporation.  Yet, even in the midst of our agricultural, mineral and now petroleum wealth, Liberia and Liberians are still among the poorest nations and peoples on earth!   It is incumbent upon the Brettenwood Institutions themselves to answer the question, how come?But the time has come for Liberia as a sovereign nation to make her own decisions about her future and the economic and financial integrity, peace, wellbeing and stability of her people.  We cannot and must not continue to allow foreigners to come here with nothing and become rich off our resources,   while our people remain perpetually poor, deprived and powerless in their own rich country.Let me ask this audience a question: Who were the chief beneficiaries of the presence of over 15,000 highly paid UNMIL personnel in Liberia for the past 11 years, since 2003?  Were they Liberians? Please answer. You are right.  The answer is a resounding No! It was foreign businesspeople who not only sold UNMIL and other international entities and personnel the goods and services, but housed them in buildings these foreign businesspeople rushed to build on the very lands I earlier alluded to, lands leased from Liberian families and churches.  Mark you, many of the families and churches had enough assets to go themselves to the banks and borrow the money to put up these buildings; but they lacked the vision, creative energy and patriotism to do so.Let me at this juncture proffer another critical proposal: that Cuttington immediately begin, from the coming academic year, a deliberate and well researched, planned and tutored course in ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPACITY BUILDING, to train Liberians to become businesspeople.  I throw out this challenge to all universities, community colleges and high schools in Liberia.  We must begin to develop a Liberian business class that will participate actively in the business sector and the economy.  The Government, I repeat, can make this happen by making it mandatory that ALL foreign businesses, whose operations are US$50,000 or more, have a Liberian partner.  Suggesting partnership with foreign companies alone is not enough. We have to know how to partner in our own interest. We have to be clear what is our interest and be focused on it.If the government does not pay keen attention to this challenge and DO something CONCRETE AND DECISIVE about it NOW, our people will remain poor, powerless and hopeless, believing and knowing that they have no stake in what is called Liberia.  They will, therefore, be ready, eager, willing and able to take part again in any insurrection that will spark the destruction of the country’s infrastructure.  Remember, that is just what   they were led to do by Charles Taylor and his band of rebels that totally destroyed the Mount Coffee Hydro, the water system in Harrisburg and everything else in Liberia, plunging the country more than 50 years in regression. Many of the nation’s assets, including huge tracks of agricultural land, petroleum blocks and mineral deposits, are being assigned to foreign conglomerates with no Liberian participation. In any country around the world, these are among their most treasured assets. If the people are not partakers in the benefits of these assets, such countries and peoples are doomed to poverty and inevitable conflict. On December 12, 1989, in a Commencement address at Cuttington, I warned that if Liberians continued to be marginalized in their own economy, it could spell trouble. The trouble commenced 12 days later, when Charles Taylor and his NPFL fired the first shots of the invasion, igniting the civil war. Bishop Hart, Archbishop-elect of West AfricaMembers of the Board of TrusteesMembers of GovernmentPresident Tokpa and Members of the Faculty and StaffParents, Guardians and SupportersMembers of the Graduating ClassThe Student Body  The Entire Cuttington CommunityMembers of the MediaDistinguished Ladies and GentlemenFriends:Permit me first to extend to you, Bishop Hart, President Tokpa, Members of the Faculty and Staff, members of the Graduating Class, the Student Body, and the entire Cuttington Community my profound thanks and appreciation for inviting me to deliver the Keynote Address on this important occasion, the 53rd Commencement Convocation of Cuttington University.  I consider this a unique honor done my family and me, especially given the fact that this is the second time you have invited me to deliver your Commencement Address.  The first was on December 12, 1989, during the Episcopacy of Bishop George D. Browne and the Presidency of Dr. Melvin J. Mason.On that occasion, I was very critical of the way our country was being run, by a gang of greedy, corrupt and wicked men, and of the effective marginalization of Liberians in their own economy.  I gave a historical account of the active involvement of Liberians in business, beginning in the early days of the Republic, and called on the Liberian government to take concrete measures to empower Liberians in business.  If this were not done, I warned, the nation would be headed for trouble again, because in the life of every individual and nation, there always comes a day of reckoning, when everyone will be called to account for his or her deeds or misdeeds.  I referred the audience to a story on the World News page of our newspaper, the Daily Observer, which reported that same week in December, 1989, that the Berlin Wall, built by East Germany’s communist dictator, Walter Ulbricht, was being torn down in a spontaneous revolt by his own people.  The day of reckoning had come for Ulbricht, the East German Communist regime and for the entire Communist empire, described by Sir Winston Churchill as “the Iron Curtain.”  Yes, it was in a speech at Fulton, Missouri in the United States, on March 5, 1946, that Churchill warned of the rise of  communism in Europe:  “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent,” he warned.And I, too, warned our own leaders and people that if the situation were not reversed for the good of the Liberian people, the day of reckoning would come for them and for all of us, when the walls of shortsightedness, selfishness, greed, corruption, mismanagement and wickedness would come tumbling down! Redeeming Liberia for Liberians is an urgent national call to restore commonsense, sanity, patriotism and ownership of this country to those to whom it belongs—the Liberians.  Alas, the people who have come here bring no money of their own but built what they have on any and everything they found here.  They are the ones who definitely believe they are the new Liberians, the veritable owners of Papa’s land.  They demonstrate this not only economically and financially, but also politically and judicially by telling the poor Liberians, “take me anywhere and it is you who will leave there, but not me.”I know of no country in the world which has given foreigners in their midst that kind of power—power over our lawyers, judges, politicians, our government officials, even the poor man and woman on the street who is thus reduced to vulnerability, subservience and powerlessness.Changing this woeful and dangerous state of affairs is extremely critical to our peace.  If it is not changed, we will have no peace.  I gave this warning in 1989, exactly a quarter century ago.  Now here we are today, far worse off than we were then.  We must arrest this terrible trend, that can lead us only down the path to more trouble.But wait! I also gave this identical advice 18 years before my 1989 Cuttington Speech!  In an address at the Booker Washington Institute in 1972, I called for the development of a Liberian merchant class.The failure of our people to listen and to act in their own good interest confirms unmistakably that something is terribly wrong with our educational system.  For what is the purpose of education if   not to uplift and move a people forward?  In Liberia, we have not been lifted up; nor have we moved forward.  We have become serfs and tenants in our own country.  Let Cuttington take the lead in reexamining the purpose and goal of education, and what form it should take to fulfil that purpose and goal.  Let me begin by proffering this idea:  the ultimate purpose of education is to LIBERATE the human mind, spirit and condition.  In today’s world, in the dire circumstances in which we find ourselves in our own country, Liberia, we cannot pursue knowledge for knowledge’s own sake.   Each of you graduating today, having learned a lot, do have something to teach to somebody.  It is incumbent on all who have a stake in education—and that means not just the government, but all of us, to impart sound learning wherever we are—and let that learning be for the liberation of our people’s mind, spirit and condition. To the Graduating Class, I urge you NEVER forget the advice which Bishop Hart gave you last Sunday: Use your talents wisely; and eschew  selfishness, greed and corruption.  Always remember Solomon’s ancient but lasting and critically important advice: “A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favor rather than silver and gold.”As you walk out of Cuttington’s hallowed walls today, remember her motto: be “Holy and wise” and lead your lives as such!  In all your learning and doing here and in the future NEVER FORGET GOD!  It is He who will guide, protect, sustain and prosper you in everything you do, and keep you moving forward.Love your country—that is the only country you have.  Go out and use everything you have learned here to make a difference for good, not for evil.  Your country is in trouble, for there are many from outside who are determined to take and keep Papa’s Land.  DON’T LET THAT HAPPEN!  And how can you do that?  By going out as patriots, and leaders, and SERVANTS of your people; by applying yourselves well in whatever your hands find to do, by being effective, honest and patriotic.  The job market is tough.  I call on the Ministry of Justice, particularly its Immigration arm, and the Ministries of Commerce and Industry and Labor to do everything to find our high school and college graduates jobs in the business houses, instead of continuing to allow the invasion into our country by foreign young people to take the jobs that Liberians can be trained to do.  This, too, is an advice that the government can ignore to its own peril.What I have just told you answers the question you may now be asking me: Mr. Best, who are the redeemers?  The redeemers are right here sitting beneath my voice: I begin with myself, for I am an employer.  If you go out and start a business, you are a redeemer because you are putting bread on someone’s table.  You are a redeemer if you expose corruption and resist against impunity. You are a redeemer if you teach somebody something that will help him or her climb the ladder of progress.  You are a redeemer if you are a conscientious, honest, hard, time-conscious and productive worker, because you are setting an example for many.  You are a redeemer if you selflessly, willingly and cheerfully help somebody else, in the same way many have helped you through life.  You are a redeemer if you love your country, your families, your people and do everything in your power to help them and Liberia to succeed.  You are a redeemer if you become part of an emerging Liberian middle class that we hope will soon arise and take charge of our economy.I thank you.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) By now you figure this is quite an overwhelming list of things Cuttington must do. But you do acknowledge that the above list is not exhaustive.  Let me add one more thing that is so critical that it takes priority among the major issues we must tackle as a nation to retain and safeguard our very sovereignty.  What could that be, Mr. Best? you ask. Is it the economy?  No, my friends.  The economy is very important but it is only a symptom of something that is crippling our nation.  Is it Ebola, HIV-Aids, malaria and all the health issues we can’t seem to manage? No, my fellowLiberians.  Health issues are alas only a warning sign of the cause of our national dysfunction and inability to develop.  Then it must be corruption or politics or religious division, even witchcraft perhaps.  No, those kinds of issues that we are so preoccupied with just blindfold us and keep us from even making it to Brazil, so to speak.In my humble view, the priority issue that outweighs anything on the long laundry list of problems to fix in Liberia is our EDUCATION SYSTEM.  Liberia once had many strong academic institutions—the College of West Africa, which trained most Liberian leaders, St. Teresa Convent, St. Patrick’s, St. John’s, the Lutheran Training Institute, Bishop Ferguson High and the Booker Washington Institute.  Most of them were established by missionaries.  Many of our Liberian luminaries on the national and world stage passed through those halls of learning and went forth into the world well prepared.  Speaking of the sound learning our pupils of yesteryear received, how many of you know that Edwin J. Barclay wrote “The Lone Star Forever” when he was only 19 years old? Yes, he was a genius, but the school system, CWA in particular, helped him develop the capacity for brilliant, creative thinking and taught him proper English to express it.The sheen of academic excellence began to fade once the missionaries left, and now many of those once famous schools are on life support with crumbling and inadequate structures, lack of instructional materials and,  most serious of all, critical shortage of qualified teachers and under-compensation of qualified ones. Many of our schools are overcrowded, lack books, laboratories, libraries and other learning materials,  drinking water, toilets, recreational facilities.  Those young children who are not in school can be found on the streets selling cold water, candy, etc. or in the markets and down waterside being breadwinners at age seven and up.  Tens of thousands of our young people are loitering and languishing with no means of an education or skills training.  The ingredients for civil strife are within the grasp of anyone who has the nerve or stupidity to choose violence to attain power.This problem is so huge, it calls for hundreds of millions of targeted, sustained expenditure of US dollars over several years to fix.  Where will that money come from in this era of budget shortfalls?   If we are crying about lack of funds for our education system today, my fellow Liberians, we will weep even harder tomorrow by “the rivers of Babylon,” where we are strangers in our own land because we have not invested in the education and training of our youth.The government must join forces with private citizens and willing partners to raise the funds needed to begin the work of building our academic system from the foundation to make up the time lost by our youth during the civil war and as a result of our foolhardy neglect.Yes, we can do this.  We have the abilities and the intellect to design an education system that produces youth, men and women who love and fear God, love and support one another, are passionate about and committed to Liberia and to our families; an education system that imparts  not only knowledge and skills but also high moral values, good character, respect for the rule of law,  work ethic, professionalism and integrity, a love for learning, critical thinking and the development of an inquiring mind that knows how to ask critical questions and work to find the answers.Let me now move on, to dwell briefly on the theme of this Address: Redeeming Liberia for Liberians.I begin with a brief and blunt statement to this audience and to our people everywhere: Liberians, we are losing our country to foreigners faster and more irrecoverably than ever before.  And unless we wake up and start working conscientiously, patriotically, smartly and hard to take it back, one day Liberia will be lost and we will have to lease from these same foreigners the land to make our farms and build our homes and businesses.Let me tell you, at the beginning of this discourse, that some of our leading Liberian families, and not so prominent ones, are leasing their prime properties  to foreign businesspeople for 30 to 60 years, mortgaging the future of their posterity for pittance.  Many of these families do not even know how long their children and grandchildren will live to benefit from their drastically delayed inheritance which, come to think of it, may be lost forever.Many of the nation’s assets, including huge tracks of agricultural land, petroleum blocks and mineral deposits, are being assigned to foreign conglomerates with no Liberian participation.  In any country around the world, these are among their most treasured assets.  If the people are not partakers in the benefits of these assets, such countries and peoples are doomed to poverty and inevitable conflict.The Liberian government and its President, Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf,  should immediately reverse this disturbing and dangerous  trend and ensure that the Liberian people, take substantial ownership in the all the nation’sFurthermore, in order to bring Liberians into the money economy and establish a strong Liberian middle class,   every company that is investing in Liberia, from merchandize trading to real estate and industrial enterprises, should have at least one substantive and credible Liberian partner.last_img read more

Football Stakeholders Confirm Statutory Committees

first_imgThe assembly of stakeholders, dubbed Congress, which is the supreme governing body of the Liberia Football Association (LFA), have for the first time endorsed seven legal committees which are not subjected to dismissal by its president.The decision was made on Saturday, January 18, 2014 during an Extra-Ordinary Congress of the LFA, with about 50 days to elections.Each member of the committees is serving for four years, and can only be dismissed by a 2/3rd majority votes in Congress.Fifty six out of the 58 delegates accepted the committees and its members in accordance with Chapter 18 of the ‘New LFA Approved Statues,’ styled: “LEGISLATIVE, EXECUTIVE.”The committees include External Audit, Election, Election Appeal, Ethics, Disciplinary, Appeal and Arbitration Board.Chapter 18, Article 30 states, “Congress is the supreme and Legislative Body; the Executive Committee shall be the Executive Body and the General Secretariat of LFA shall be the Administrative Body, and whereas the Disciplinary, Ethics and Appeal Committees shall constitute the Judicial Bodies of the LFA.”“Electoral committee and the Election Appeals Committee shall organize and supervise the election process,” Article 30.5 states.Chairmen of the various committees include: John Davis, External Audit; Malcolm Joseph, Election; Justice Soko Sackor, Election Appeal; Atty. Medina Wesseh, Ethics; Cllr. Izetta S. Wesley, Disciplinary; Cllr. John Kollie, Appeal; Atty. Sarfuah Gray, Abitration.The president of FC BYC, Sekou Konneh alarmed the inclusion of Mamadee Djakete on the Arbitration Committee, who is serving as Deputy Managing Director of the Renaissance Communications Incorporated (RCI) a conglomeration of Truth FM, Real TV and Renaissance Newspaper, owned by LFA president Musa Bility.Sekou Konneh quieted when he was told by the Congress chairman Musa Bility to show his disagreement through his vote.Some changes in the statutes stated that every member of the Executive Committee will be elected by Congress, and every candidate must be proposed by five members (clubs). Before, members of the Executive Committee were elected by their constituents, which were their clubs.The revised statutes have reduced the number of members of the Executive Committee from 18 to 13, which include the president, two vice presidents, the women representative and other nine members of the Executive Committee.According to the New Statutes, all executive members will not be younger than 25 years, and the president and vice presidents will have a minimum qualification of a Bachelor’s Degree. The other members of the Executive Committee will have a minimum qualification of a high school diploma.“They shall not have found guilty of a criminal offence. They shall have the Liberian nationality and shall have the residency within the territory of Liberia,” the Statutes states.The new statutes categorically emphasized the neutrality of the football house, saying that the LFA is neutral in matters of politics and religion.The statutes said the discrimination of any kind against a country, private person or group of people on account of race, skin color, ethnic, national or social origin, gender, language, religion, political opinion or any other opinion, wealth, birth or any other status, sexual orientation or any other reason is strictly prohibited and punishable by suspension or expulsion.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Women CSOs Call for Stronger, More Targeted Actions in Post-2015 MDG Framework

first_imgThe Women Civil Society Post-Millennium Development Goals Steering Committee has called on the Liberian Government, through the Gender Minister Julia Duncan Cassell, to take strong action at a global level to ensure that the Post-2015 Development Framework has the rights of all women and girls at heart.The Women NGOs secretariat is a national network of over nine women civil society organizations established in October 2012 with the objective of giving women a voice and advancing their issues in the ongoing discourses about framing a global agenda to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  The network has member organizations including the Liberia Women Media Action Committee (LIWOMAC) in Liberia, as well as others in Ghana, Kenya and the United Kingdom.According to a letter written to the Gender Minister, the Network recognized and welcomed the Liberian Government’s participation in the Post-2015 negotiations, as well as efforts made over the past years to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment through the adoption and implementation of the African Union Protocol.“In this regard,” wrote Marpue M. Speare and T. Estella Nelson, Chairperson and Liaison, respectively, on behalf of the Steering Committee, “we want to urge you to continue your support for women’s rights especially as the negotiations for the Post-2015 framework enter the crucial, final year.”Specifically, they are calling on the Liberian Government to raise three cardinal issues: the need for a standalone goal on gender equality and women’s rights; targeted action to tackle violence against women and girls; and for Gender equality and women’s rights to be mainstreamed across the new framework’s goals, targets and indicators, particularly health and education.The group observed that it is widely recognized that the current MDGs failed to fully address gender inequality, for instance by omitting to include a target on violence against women and girls. “It is imperative that the international community learns from this failure and ensures the new framework comprehensively addresses women’s human rights and gender equality,” the Committee maintains.  Stating that targeted action to tackle violence against women and girls should be a target to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls; and in order to ensure the target is fully implemented, the Committee insists there should be indicators that measure: states’ capability to protect survivors and prevent and respond to violence, the objective situation regarding levels of violence as well as perceptions in society about violence.The issue of gender equality and women’s rights to be mainstreamed across the new framework’s goals, targets and indicators, particularly health and education, also  failed to consider the safety of girls in school, teenage pregnancy, risk encountered by rural girls while traveling to school and quality of education (which compasses teacher quality and compensation, rural-urban disparity and income inequality). It therefore failed to address the spectrum of challenges girls face in accessing education.“Regarding MDG 4 on reducing maternal and child mortality we have seen improvements due to efforts by the government and its partners to improve the health sector,” the Committee said. “However, inadequate infrastructure and low capacity in obstetric care services remain a major threat to the safety of women giving birth in Liberia.“Diseases in our society also disproportionately affect women. For example, the vast majority of those who’ve died since the outbreak of the Ebola Virus in our society are women.”According to the Steering Committee, efforts to achieve gender equality in the new framework will only be successful if gender is mainstreamed across goals, targets and indicators – particularly those on health and education.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

PUL’s US$100,000 Case Reawakens

first_imgLiberian journalists under the banner, “Journalists Dignity,” have begun an advocacy for the prosecution of one of their former presidents—George Barpeen.The journalists are calling for Mr. Barpeen to account for US$100,000 donated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to the Press Union of Liberia about five years ago.The money was meant for the construction of PUL headquarters. Making their presence felt during celebration of World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu, Gbarpolu County on May 3, 2014, journalists including Eddie Harmon and J. Edwood N. Dennis assertively indicated that the misapplication of the money has dented the credibility of all journalists.The group said they are going to continue their advocacy until tangible result is established on how the money was handled.Speaking to the Daily Observer, broadcast Journalist Eddie Harmon said the fate of the money donated by President Sirleaf continues to be in limbo, and on many occasions journalists are attacked of corruption, receiving reproach that they are not credible to speak or write about corruption when they (journalists) themselves are corrupt and have embezzled the President’s donations to the Union.According to Journalist Harmon, this situation has a negative reflection on the media and all journalists in Liberia as they write and report corruption in high places.“We are all affected by this stigma of the misapplication of this US$100,000 and not George Barpeen alone.  You will be questioned about it as a journalist, and you will have to justify how the money was used,” Harmon noted.The case surrounding the US$100,000 is in court, but Mr. Harmon said considering the delay in adjudicating the case, it is better to turn it around by advocating for the indictment of the Press Union leadership that handled the money to account because if nothing is done, journalists’ credibility will continue to be questioned.According to him, the company that was contracted to construct the PUL headquarters now no longer exists. However, he disclosed that the company now uses different nomenclature, and as such it makes it uncertain for people to know whether the company can be traced. He failed to give the new name that the company now operates under.Harmon and Dennis in a collective view said the campaign is meant to mount pressure on the leadership of the PUL to push for the case and not to be dead as those connected to it allegedly want it to be.Other concerned journalists at the World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu joined the campaign by chanting slogan of the campaigners, calling for judicial probe into the matter to establish the status of the money.Reacting to the concern raised by the journalists, Press Union president K. Abdullai Kamara said expression of views about issue is one of the characteristics of free press and therefore does not have any problem with the campaign staged by the journalists during the World Press Freedom celebration.Mr. Kamara said his predecessors—George Barpeen to whom the money was given and Peter Quaqua, who also took the matter to court, had both given written statements about the fate of the money, and a committee is investigating the matter.He, however, assured that the company to which US$98,000 was given still exists and according to him, the company contends that the amount was small for the size of the building to be constructed.The PUL president said at the Union leadership level, they are embarking on the company to provide the money given because it is not doing the work for which the money was intended.He said the matter in court is about the cancellation of the contract between PUL and the unknown contractor, and that the judge is about to come out with a decision which makes it difficult for it (case) to be withdrawn from the court now.It can be recalled that President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf donated US$100,000 to the PUL for the construction of headquarter for the media umbrella organization.Former Press Union president George Barpeen amidst protests from some quarters for rejection of the gratuity defended that it was not an ethical breach for the Union to receive the money from the President as it was meant for development that will reflect the image of the country.Since the donation, the proposed site of the organization in Sinkor lies in ruin with no sign of development taking place there.The fate of the money has since been in limbo and the matter taken to court for cancellation of the contract.President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf during the installation of former president Peter Quaqua for the second term of office rhetorically praised the media for working hard to expose and report corruption in government, but raise concern about the US$100,000 in this way: “We recognize the role of the press in exposing corruption and reporting it as government has opened the enabling environment to exercise this freedom.  However, we still look up to the media to give us account for the US$100,000 given sometimes back to construct headquarters for the union.”This concern sparked up criticism among journalists against the leadership of George Barpeen with prejudice that hierarchies of the union had shared the money leaving the project undone. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Victoria’s Passion: Playing it fair

first_imgVictoria Kabba, 18, loves soccer and makes her contribution to develop it as a referee, she told the Daily Observer in an interview last Saturday, at the Antoinette Tubman Stadium. And she is among the youngest female soccer referees of the Liberia Referees Association, (LIFRA).“I began two years ago,” Kabba said. “I visited the Antoinette Tubman Stadium to participate in a track and field event. And at the time, a number of referees were also engaged in their early morning exercises.”She said a lady she named as Sister Christmas, “encouraged me when she saw that I was highly impressed with what the referees were doing.” Thereafter, he sought enquiries at the LFA and registered and eventually began to get assistance from the Liberia Referees Association.“LIFRA officials told me that I can become a good referee and help of officiate female games,” Ms. Kakka told the Daily Observer.A 9th grade student of the Prince Y. Johnson Junior High School, on GSA Road in Paynvesville, Ms. Kabba has never wavered in her desire to become a referee and she finds encouragement when she serves as a lineswoman to officiate a match.“I find excitement as an authority on the field when I perform as a lineswoman in a game at the Antoinette Tubman Stadium,” she said.She admitted there have been challenges when signals in games did not go well with players, and some have issued insults at her.“At LIFRA training I’m told such would happen and so when it happens I learn from it,” she said.Meanwhile, she appealed to female footballers to understand that when a game is in progress, referees and linesmen (women) work hard to apply the laws of the game with fairness. Though Ms. Victoria Kabba (MaaVic) did not rule out human error, she said referees are honest people trying to do a job that has a great deal of emotion.On her growth, she expressed appreciation to LIFRA officials and members for their encouragement, “and also supporting me to be what I want to be.”Her guardian, Mr. Sayma S. Sayon, she said has supported her interest. “She helps me with transportation and LIFRA’s officials also help me and I thank them very much.”Her role model, she said is referee Francis Sannoh. “I watch him when he is training and exercising and I model my training after him,” she said. There are more than 15 females in the Liberia Referees Association nationwide who handle the female league of the Liberia Football Association. With the LFA’s focus on providing additional support to female soccer, female referees will have the chance to practice their trade to enjoy the world’s number one game: soccer.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

HOPE Worldwide Liberia, LTA Embark on Ebola Door-to Door Campaign

first_imgHOPE Worldwide Liberia, a faith-based organization, in collaboration with Liberia Telecommunications Authority (LTA), has embarked on a three-day door-to-door Ebola awareness and sensitization campaign at the LBS Lover Street Community in Paynesville.The three-day awareness campaign, according to Hope Worldwide Liberia  executive director, Dorbor Mark Suah,   was intended to buttress government’s efforts in eradicating the virus from Liberia and providing support to victims and survivors, especially children in the community.Mr. Suah told reporters yesterday it is not proper to  sit  in comfort zones and watch others suffer. “It is our responsibility as disciples to love and care for the poor, the needy and the oppressed.”He said the church also trained volunteers to go from door-to-door, distributing posters, fliers, fact sheets and other materials to educate people on Ebola.“The goal of our campaign is to help families and neighbors understand the virus and the actions necessary to prevent it from further spreading,” he explained.Mr. Suah also informed the volunteers that Ebola is real, but it can be prevented by taken all the necessary measures announced by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and other international health organizations who are help to kick Ebola out of Liberia. He urged the public to take careful measures by washing our hands, avoiding shaking hands and burying the dead.  HOPE Worldwide Liberia also distributed food items and anti-Ebola materials valued at US$2000 to few residents in the LBS Lover Street Community.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more