PUL’s US$100,000 Case Reawakens

first_imgLiberian journalists under the banner, “Journalists Dignity,” have begun an advocacy for the prosecution of one of their former presidents—George Barpeen.The journalists are calling for Mr. Barpeen to account for US$100,000 donated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to the Press Union of Liberia about five years ago.The money was meant for the construction of PUL headquarters. Making their presence felt during celebration of World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu, Gbarpolu County on May 3, 2014, journalists including Eddie Harmon and J. Edwood N. Dennis assertively indicated that the misapplication of the money has dented the credibility of all journalists.The group said they are going to continue their advocacy until tangible result is established on how the money was handled.Speaking to the Daily Observer, broadcast Journalist Eddie Harmon said the fate of the money donated by President Sirleaf continues to be in limbo, and on many occasions journalists are attacked of corruption, receiving reproach that they are not credible to speak or write about corruption when they (journalists) themselves are corrupt and have embezzled the President’s donations to the Union.According to Journalist Harmon, this situation has a negative reflection on the media and all journalists in Liberia as they write and report corruption in high places.“We are all affected by this stigma of the misapplication of this US$100,000 and not George Barpeen alone.  You will be questioned about it as a journalist, and you will have to justify how the money was used,” Harmon noted.The case surrounding the US$100,000 is in court, but Mr. Harmon said considering the delay in adjudicating the case, it is better to turn it around by advocating for the indictment of the Press Union leadership that handled the money to account because if nothing is done, journalists’ credibility will continue to be questioned.According to him, the company that was contracted to construct the PUL headquarters now no longer exists. However, he disclosed that the company now uses different nomenclature, and as such it makes it uncertain for people to know whether the company can be traced. He failed to give the new name that the company now operates under.Harmon and Dennis in a collective view said the campaign is meant to mount pressure on the leadership of the PUL to push for the case and not to be dead as those connected to it allegedly want it to be.Other concerned journalists at the World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu joined the campaign by chanting slogan of the campaigners, calling for judicial probe into the matter to establish the status of the money.Reacting to the concern raised by the journalists, Press Union president K. Abdullai Kamara said expression of views about issue is one of the characteristics of free press and therefore does not have any problem with the campaign staged by the journalists during the World Press Freedom celebration.Mr. Kamara said his predecessors—George Barpeen to whom the money was given and Peter Quaqua, who also took the matter to court, had both given written statements about the fate of the money, and a committee is investigating the matter.He, however, assured that the company to which US$98,000 was given still exists and according to him, the company contends that the amount was small for the size of the building to be constructed.The PUL president said at the Union leadership level, they are embarking on the company to provide the money given because it is not doing the work for which the money was intended.He said the matter in court is about the cancellation of the contract between PUL and the unknown contractor, and that the judge is about to come out with a decision which makes it difficult for it (case) to be withdrawn from the court now.It can be recalled that President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf donated US$100,000 to the PUL for the construction of headquarter for the media umbrella organization.Former Press Union president George Barpeen amidst protests from some quarters for rejection of the gratuity defended that it was not an ethical breach for the Union to receive the money from the President as it was meant for development that will reflect the image of the country.Since the donation, the proposed site of the organization in Sinkor lies in ruin with no sign of development taking place there.The fate of the money has since been in limbo and the matter taken to court for cancellation of the contract.President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf during the installation of former president Peter Quaqua for the second term of office rhetorically praised the media for working hard to expose and report corruption in government, but raise concern about the US$100,000 in this way: “We recognize the role of the press in exposing corruption and reporting it as government has opened the enabling environment to exercise this freedom.  However, we still look up to the media to give us account for the US$100,000 given sometimes back to construct headquarters for the union.”This concern sparked up criticism among journalists against the leadership of George Barpeen with prejudice that hierarchies of the union had shared the money leaving the project undone. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Searching for Sadness in New York: Is the Foursquare API Living Up to Its Potential?

first_imgThis feels like it could be the first steps towards accomplishing what was described in the opening lines of the Headmap Manifesto:there are notes in boxes that are empty every room has an accessible historyevery place has emotional attachments you can open and saveyou can search for sadness in new york Tags:#APIs#Big Data#hack Why You Love Online Quizzes And here’s how Foursquare’s data analysis system works: As explained in this blog post, Foursquare needed a way for its business staff to run reports based on its data without slowing down production servers and without learning technologies such as Scala and MongoDB. The company decided to make its data available to business staff through a Hadoop cluster hosted by Amazon Web Services. Foursquare’s data miners could then query it using Hive, which provides a SQL-like query language for Hadoop.As a proof-of-concept the company has produced a report on the rudest cities in the world, based on the number of tips that contain profanity. Which is pretty cool (apart from the assumption that profanity use = rudeness). But it makes me realize just how under-utilized geolocation APIs are.Here are the results of Foursquare’s profanity-mining: Some more practical applications, from a business standpoint, for data mining staff might include determining:Which venues are fakes or duplicates (so we can delete them), what areas of the country are drawn to which kinds of venues (so we can help them promote themselves), and what are the demographics of our users in Belgium (so we can surface useful information)?Of course, this sort of check-in data is solely in the hands of Foursquare’s internal users. But it makes me wonder whether you could pull together information like this through the Foursquare API if you build your own data warehouse for analysis.I wonder what services like Fourwhere (which we covered here) could learn by caching all the data retrieved from location various APIs and running sentiment analysis on it. What could MisoTrendy (coverage) tell us about a venue based long-term trend patterns? Is there something in Foursquare’s terms of service that prevents people from doing this? I guess we’re back to that old question what would you do with the massive data sets produced by persistent location tracking?Update: MisoTrendy’s Andrew Ferenci explains the limitations:1. You would not be able to pull and process historical data like 4SQ did from their production databases and log files (only real-time data/ hard for small web app to run queries that generate 1bn records)2. If you use something like Google Apps Engine you have lots of limitations on DB and backend processing (only 80-90K hits before you have to start payinh)3. Most third party applications would only be able to pull real-time data from 4SQ API, so no backend processing.However, if you decided you want to create an application to do pull similar data starting today, you would definitely be able to, but not as the same historical breadth. Techincally, its all feasible with some limitations. Misotrendy was built using Google Apps Engine with a Python backend. There are limitations for the DB and backend processing because you cannot use Ruby on Rails with this setup. klint finley How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Related Posts 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

Beats headsets prove to be popular at the FIFA world cup despite ban

first_imgBrazil’s Neymar wearing Beats headphones.Beats by Dr Dre in the last weeks has been in the limelight as Apple acquired it. Now it has kicked up yet another storm as the headphones made by it have been banned at the 2014 FIFA world cup, which is currently being held in Brazil.The headphones have proven to be popular with star players like Neymar, Wayne Rooney and Luis Suarez, but the players are banned from wearing them as FIFA has a deal with Sony, which also makes headphones.The colourful headphones have become a fashion icon of sorts. This was also a reason Apple decided to shell out $3 billion for the company, the highest it has ever spent on an acquisition.While pundits have often criticised the sound quality of the Beats headphones, they have proven popular with celebrities.Even at the world cup, players are forced to use Sony headphones inside the world cup stadiums due to FIFA’s contractual obligations, but players like Neymar and Suarez have been seen using their personal Beats’ headphones in practice sessions.In a way, this lends them a discrete level of authenticity as the players are not forced to use them unlike the Sony headphones.In the lead up to the world cup, Beats even released a video with Neymar, Luis Suarez, Mario Goetze, Robin Van Persie, and Javier Hernandez, which received 10.6 million views on YouTube, highlighting the popularity of the brand.last_img read more

College Spun’s Staff Picks For Week 9 Of The 2015 Season

first_imgJames Franklin congratulates Carl Nassib after play.STATE COLLEGE, PA – NOVEMBER 29: Head coach James Franklin congratulates Carl Nassib #95 of the Penn State Nittany Lions after a third down stop against the Michigan State Spartans at Beaver Stadium on November 29, 2014 in State College, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Joe Sargent/Getty Images)Another weekend of college football, another absolutely insane ending to a big-time contest. This time around, it was Georgia Tech returning a blocked field goal for a touchdown to knock off Florida State as time expired. It won’t surprise you to hear that nobody on our staff picked the Yellow Jackets to pull the upset.This week’s slate isn’t as exciting as some earlier this year, but there are a few marquee matchups. Ole Miss and Auburn should be entertaining. Florida and Georgia renew their annual rivalry. And Notre Dame visits a surprising Temple squad in front of ESPN’s College GameDay.Dustin Tackett still holds a one-game lead over the field in our competition. Here are our picks for this week.Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 4.19.07 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-28 at 4.19.23 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-28 at 4.19.33 PMWho do you have?last_img read more

Mobay High School Gets New Classroom Block

first_imgMontego Bay High School for Girls in St. James is the beneficiary of a new classroom block, which was provided by Food For the Poor Jamaica.Executive Director, David Mair, symbolically handed over the block, comprising three classrooms, to Acting Principal, Gairy Powell, at the school’s annual prize-giving ceremony on November 22, during which the building was dedicated.Mr. Mair said he was pleased that Food For the Poor was able to facilitate the classrooms development, “which will add to the already rich history of this noble institution”, while acknowledging the contributions of other partner donors.“Thanks to our donors whose generosity and compassion have resulted in more classroom space for the students and teachers, thus providing a more conducive teaching and learning environment,” he stated.Acting Principal, Gairy Powell, said Food For the Poor’s gesture is timely as Montego Bay High is in need of expansion, adding that the provision of the new block is “a good start”.“For the past two years, the intention of the school was to expand our subject offerings. A year ago, we introduced Performing Arts to grades 10 and 11 students. However, that subject requires an open space for students to do stage handling, and we did not have any classroom space to facilitate that kind of activity. Hence, we reached out to Food For the Poor to see if they could assist us in building such a structure,” he said.Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid (second right), and Acting Principal of Montego Bay High School for Girls in St. James, Gairy Powell (left), share a moment with guests participating in the brief dedication ceremony on November 22 for the institution’s new classroom block, donated by Food For the Poor. Others (from second left) are: Food For the Poor Executive Director, David Mair; retired teacher of the school, Dahlia Hewling-Robinson; and Chairperson for the School’s Board, Myrtle Dwyer. The building, which comprises three classrooms, is named in honour of Mrs. Hewling-Robinson and another retired teacher of the institution, Thora Levy.Mr. Powell informed that the building, which houses three classrooms, will be used as the clothing and textiles centre, adding that the space previously occupied by the latter now serves as the performing arts hub.The classroom block, which was constructed over 14 weeks, is named in honour of two of the school’s retired teachers, Thora Levy and Dahlia Hewling-Robinson.Meanwhile, the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information has provided the school with $15 million, which, along with contributions from other partner donors, will be used to undertake further expansion, slated to begin in either December, or January 2019.last_img read more

Canadian facing child exploitation charges arrested near US border

first_imgHOULTON, Maine – U.S. border patrol officers have charged three Canadians with unlawful entry after they were seen walking in northern Maine, including one man facing child exploitation charges in Nova Scotia.According to court documents filed June 1 with the U.S. District Court in Bangor, Maine, the three were apprehended May 31 near Houlton, Maine, which is not far from the border crossing at Woodstock, N.B.The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency alleges that Jesse Christopher Leblanc, Chelsey Ann Fitch of Fredericton and Aaron Byron Cumberland of Nova Scotia crossed the border at a spot that is not designated as a port of entry.In an affidavit submitted to the court, border patrol agent Matthew McLellan said the three were seen carrying backpacks on the Canadian side of the border on a road parallel to the international boundary before they were spotted on a road in Maine that leads away from the border.The agent said a fingerprint check later determined Cumberland is facing charges in Nova Scotia, including luring a child and invitation to sexual touching, though he had been released on conditions.McLellan’s affidavit says those conditions include an order that he remain in Nova Scotia and refrain from possessing any electronic device that can access the internet. The affidavit says Cumberland had a cellphone and a laptop with him when he was arrested.McLellan said all three initially offered false identities, saying they had “no claimed countries of citizenship.”The agent said none of them was carrying proper identification.“They also initially claimed to not believe in or recognize international borders or boundaries but believe that travel between countries should be free and uninhibited.”last_img read more

Forest Service taking comments on Idaho openpit mine plan

first_imgBOISE, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is taking comments and holding a public meeting on proposed exploration drilling for an open-pit molybdenum mine a Canadian company is considering in the Boise National Forest in central Idaho.The agency on Friday released an updated environmental assessment involving drilling planned by a subsidiary of Vancouver, British Columbia-based American CuMo Mining Corporation.The proposed plan would allow about 13 miles (21-kilometres) of new roads and the use of about 5 miles (8 kilometres) of existing unauthorized roads to reach up to 122 drill pads in the 2,885-acre (1,200-hectare) site.A federal judge in 2016 rejected a previous plan as lacking information about a plant called Sacajawea’s bitterroot. The Forest Service says the most recent plan fixes that problem.A public meeting is set for Jan. 9 in Boise.Keith Ridler, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Kejriwal selling false dreams BJP on AAP manifesto

first_imgNew Delhi: Responding to Aam Aadmi Party’s manifesto release, BJP National Vice-President Shyam Jaju held a press conference on Thursday with Leader of Opposition in Delhi Assembly Vijender Gupta, saying that the party chief Arvind Kejriwal is a merchant of dreams who sells new dreams every day.Slamming the AAP manifesto Jaju said that it was nothing but a bundle of false promises. “They seemed to have the full-statehood issue just to cover up for their mistakes in the last four years,” Also Read – Arms supplier arested from Rajasthanhe said. Moreover, Jaju said that Delhi does not need full statehood for basic services and amenities to be provided for its citizens. He said that Kejriwal has completely failed in running the system and hence he is misleading the voters by making false promises. LoP Gupta said that for full statehood to become a reality, it needs to pass through the lower house by a two-thirds majority, which is not possible for AAP to achieve. “Hence, it seems absurd for him to make such promises to the electorate,” he said. Further attacking the opposition, Gupta said that the manifesto is just an excuse for the party to hide its incapability in the last four years. He said that AAP failed to fulfill promises it made in 2015 and it will just keep repeating this throughout.last_img read more

Skeptical Football Special Midterm Edition

It’s been a busy midterm week at FiveThirtyEight. Which is to say, a busy week evaluating the NFL at its mid-term point. After nine weeks of action, every team has played at least eight games, which means it’s time for the inaugural Skeptical Football Midterm Awards.Most Valuable PlayerAlso known as the “Best Combination of Passing Yards and Touchdowns by a Quarterback, Unless You’re a Running Back Who Rushes for 2,000 Yards or Breaks a Touchdown Record” Award.That MVPs are nearly always QBs is OK with me. Really, players at other positions can be extremely impressive, but the odds of the true “most valuable” player not being a QB in any given year are small — and even if some other player were theoretically more valuable, the odds that there’d be enough data to be confident of it are virtually nil. Imagine your team is lucky enough to have the best quarterback in football (whoever that might be) — is there any chance you would trade him for any other player, ever?1If you want to be nitpicky about the hypothetical: Assume all alternate players are average or replacement level, and that all players would cost the same amount. And that it would be for one year so age wouldn’t be a factor. And you are actually trying to win that year. Etc.Maybe it’s possible,2One of the best candidates I can think of for this kind of trade would be Randy Moss on the 2007 Patriots. He had a demonstrated record of turning mediocre QBs into superstars. but this definitely isn’t one of those years — there are probably five to 10 QBs right now whom you would never want your team to trade for any non-QB.So let’s talk about most valuable players. The fundamental metric for evaluating players of all positions should be some version of wins produced.3Ideally, championships. But typically this overlaps with wins. Because we can model the chances of a team winning at any point in a given game, we can determine how much those odds change on each play that a player is involved in — also known as WPA or Win Percentage Added. But this stat is extremely noisy and susceptible to huge influence from very random situations (a whole season can come down to whether the QB throws an incomplete pass or not on a single down with the game on the line).Since we can also model how many points a team ought to score — on average — from a particular starting position (down/distance/yard line), we can measure how much a player contributes to his team’s expected points. Since this is more granular than wins, it makes for a powerful proxy. But points can be skewed, too — mostly from plays during garbage time at the end of games, but also from very high-value but unpredictable plays such as fumbles.Then there’s the additional complication of who gets credit for what. It takes a village to complete a pass. And the running game — traditionally credited to running backs — is frequently set up by the pass. Plus, in some cases QBs even call plays themselves — so why shouldn’t they get credit for the entire offense?Chart of the weekSo to get a better look at the big picture, I’m plotting WPA against expected points added (EPA).4For balance, I’ve included the total win percentage above expectation per drive (including the running game) for WPA, but points above expectation from the QB’s passes alone for EPA. You can think of it as “raw passing contribution” on the x-axis and “overall effect on the bottom line” on the y-axis:The trend line is a quarterback’s expected effect on his team’s chances of winning based on his EPA. There are a number of reasons why a QB might be beating it, such as when the rest of his offense is strong (e.g., Alex Smith with Jamaal Charles), or he might contribute a lot with his running (Russell Wilson), or he’s just gotten lucky (or been better) at the right times.I’ve given Aaron Rodgers a fair amount of flak around here for not “slinging” it enough. In my estimation, he hasn’t taken the necessary risks to improve his team’s chances of winning in the situations that can make such risks worthwhile. But he’s a great QB, no doubt. He’s third behind Peyton Manning and Philip Rivers for EPA/drive, and leads WPA/drive by a wide margin. In fact, his WPA/drive is nearly twice Manning’s.But as I said, WPA can be deceiving. About 40 percent of Rodgers’s WPA for the entire season comes from a single touchdown scoring drive against the Dolphins, and about three-quarters of that comes from the last two plays of the drive alone. Dare I say? So far this season, Rodgers has been a “clutch” quarterback, coming through at the right times for the 5-3 Packers. That’s great for him, and Packers fans should be happy about it.But I’m still going to risk the Green-and-Yellow wrath and give the award to Manning anyway.Why? Because come on, the most valuable player in the NFL doesn’t just up and change from year to year because one QB has a few more good days than another. If Manning has been the MVP five times in the last 11 years, and there’s no evidence of him getting any worse whatsoever, what are the odds that someone has surpassed him?It’s like instant replay5Or any other situation involving a high burden of proof.: The ruling on the field is that Manning is still the best player in the NFL, and to overturn that ruling takes (nearly) indisputable evidence. That caliber of evidence rarely even exists in the NFL, and it certainly doesn’t in this case.Defensive Player of the Mid-YearFor all the complexity involved in statistically evaluating quarterbacks, it’s practically tic-tac-toe compared to evaluating defensive players. Sure, we record tackles, sacks, interceptions and forced fumbles (and now even more advanced things like how often a cornerback is targeted by the opposing offense), but for any given player these touch on a tiny fraction of plays he’s involved in.And allocating responsibility on defense is even harder than it is on offense. Football is a dynamic game. An advantage may be created in one spot and realized in another. If one of a team’s interior linemen draws a lot of attention, that may lead to a defensive end getting an abnormally high number of sacks. The effect of an advantage might also be distributed diffusely, such as when a cornerback is so good that he constantly single-covers the opponent’s best receiver, freeing up other options for the other defenders.6The even worse scenario is that a defensive player could be so good that his team chooses to spend less money on defense.In other words, I’m flying pretty blind. I’m pretty sure Deion Sanders was good. But, say, Reggie White, I don’t know. Probably. So rather than try to solve the impossible, let me fall back on a classic cop-out: Who’s the best player on the league’s best defense?Which brings me to…Twitter question of the week It doesn’t matter whether the Dolphins are “underestimated.” But it does matter that the Dolphins’ defense has been really, really good this year.Dolphins opponents have scored about half a point per drive less than their expectation (and Miami has faced a tougher-than-average schedule).7It’s such an offensive year that a defense holding par versus the models is good for ninth-best in the league. While there is still variance to deal with, we don’t have to caveat the results as much as we do with QBs: The sample sizes are relatively big, and the measurement is more direct. However, the Dolphins’ WPA still takes a pretty big hit from that one Aaron Rodgers comeback drive in Week 6 (take that out and they’d be almost 10 percentage points higher in WPA).In other words, as good as it’s been, Miami’s D somewhat underperformed in the first half of the season. As always, I’d expect some regression to the mean in the second half of the season, but there’s good reason to expect the team not to regress as much as normal.So who’s the best player on the Dolphins’ defense? Based on stats alone, I have no idea. But I can consult the most objective authority on player value that I know: “Madden 15.” According to the game, Cameron Wake is the best player on the Dolphins (defensive or otherwise) by a wide margin:So there you go, Wake wins my DPOY award by virtue of being the most respected Dolphin among video-game programmers (aka the Hacker Gods of the worlds we simulate.)Rookie of the Mid-YearI love tracking rookie quarterbacks, but mostly because predicting their future performance is an interesting endeavor that has little to do with their quality of play. Unlike the contenders for “most valuable player” awards, rookie QBs are rarely very good — or if they are, we probably can’t tell because the best ones tend to play for crappy teams. So it is this year, where the most efficient rookie QB is still well below league average.Rookie “of the year” is also different from “most valuable” rookie, because it opens the door for rookies who may be incredibly good at their position even though their position isn’t the most important.One rookie is not only good for his position, but has arguably been the best in the league. My Rookie of the Year (so far) award goes to Chandler Catanzaro, placekicker for the Arizona Cardinals:Catanzaro has yet to miss this year — one of only four perfect kickers remaining8The others are Adam Vinatieri, Nick Novak, and Josh Brown. — and he has the highest points above expectation per attempt of all kickers. And unlike other stats in football, delivering the points expected of them is basically 95 percent of what kickers do (occasionally they have to tackle), and they’re 95 percent responsible for it (they can get bad snaps or the offensive line can let through a blocker). This is why I love kickers: They’re some of the only entities in the NFL we can evaluate with any precision.There’s still a fair amount of variance, of course, but it’s all very measurable and predictable.9For example, in Week 8 the NFL had a great week of kicking (14th-best in 14 years), but this past week kickers were pretty bad, putting up the 190th-best week (of 230) in that period. For the diehards: Skeptical Football’s most valuable kicker from Week 9 was Billy Cundiff, and its least valuable was Patrick Murray: And it’s not like it would be shocking for a young kicker to be among the best in the league.Comeback Player of the Mid-YearIsn’t it a bit weird that Peyton Manning has five MVP trophies, and also has a Comeback Player of the Year award? Like, his mantle wasn’t crowded enough, so they had to give him another award for having neck surgery. Other winners include Matthew Stafford, Tom Brady, Drew Brees, and … Chad Pennington? Twice?How I could approach this award empirically was bugging me, but then it was staring me right in the face: Practically half of what I write is about QB “comebacks.”Incidentally, I keep coming back to this issue10For continuity, I’m giving Gunslinger of the week to the Oakland Raiders’ Derek Carr, who had two interceptions in a Week 9 comeback effort that ultimately fell just short against the defending NFL champion Seattle Seahawks. not because I’m enthralled by the quasi-mystical power of the comeback clutch-osity, but because it’s where I think a lot of QBs are too conservative — and their teams’ chances suffer as a consequence. It’s sort of like the NFL statisticians’ obsession with coaches not going for it enough on fourth down.Given my own obsessions, then, this is the award that’s most important to get right. So, to aid my analysis, I’ve created a chart to profile each quarterback’s comeback game. But instead of focusing on specific comeback thresholds (like the normal 9-point second-half deficit I often work with), I compared how each quarterback did relative to expectation for all scenarios, based on his expectation in each scenario. (E.g., if a QB has a 10 percent chance of winning, I’ll treat it the same whether that 10 percent is due to being down a small amount in the fourth quarter or a large amount in the first quarter.)11To do this, I first took every play that the quarterback was involved with, then plotted whether his team won or not (relative to his team’s expected win rate before the play). Unfortunately, since there are thousands of data points, that just led to two black lines. So to see what was going on I used R to create a smooth curve. (Using geom_smooth() in ggplot2. Since each QB has more than 1,000 data points, R uses a generalized additive model.) That gave me the regression’s estimate for how often the QB would typically win given a prior probability.I plotted a handful of Skeptical Football’s favorite QBs for comparison …Experimental chart of the weekAdmittedly, this is an unfair comparison: QBs who play for stronger teams are going to win more often than ones who play for weak teams, so that will certainly affect their “curves.” But what’s fascinating to me are the shapes.To start with, Peyton Manning not only wins a larger percentage of games than he is “supposed” to, but he exceeds that rate with just about the most perfect curve of anyone in the entire data set. It’s as if his game is starting to approach a mathematical ideal of good quarterbacking.12It also makes Manning a great point for comparison. For other QBs, we see more variation — some of it random, and some of it following pretty clear patterns:Tom Brady and the Patriots have basically matched Manning in situations where they ought to have a low probability of winning, but in games they were supposed to win 80 percent of the time, they’ve only won 80 percent of the time. For shame.Aaron Rodgers (as expected), has a pretty unremarkable record (relative to his own high standard) in situations where his team is expected to lose, but does very well in competitive games or games in which his team is front-running.Philip Rivers is sort of a less extreme version of Brady. This surprised me because I’ve previously thought of him as a slightly less good but slightly less gun-shy version of Rodgers. But it looks like they’re actually quite the opposite (notice how the blue and yellow lines make an X shape).And that brings us to Matthew Stafford and Tony Romo. Perhaps not coincidentally, both are Gunslinger of the Week recipients this year (Stafford has won twice), and both have extremely lopsided curves: Note how Stafford wins about as much when his team has a 40 percent chance of winning as when it has a 75 percent chance. This suggests, as I theorized last week regarding Tim Tebow, that Stafford’s comeback success may not be as much a conscious adjustment to sling it more when trailing. Instead, it could be that his perma-risk game is naturally calibrated to extracting as much win as possible from underdog scenarios, but also leads to a lot of blunders that cost his team wins otherwise.13Or it could just be that the Lions are terrible and only win at all because of Stafford’s superhuman efforts. You decide. If you combined the way Stafford plays when his team is down with the way Rodgers plays with his team ahead, you’d have a heck of a QB!Tony Romo’s curve is a little less dramatic than Stafford’s is, but it’s still pretty clear. Let’s look at it on a scale of 0 to Manning:Romo’s practically Tony Manning when his team is way behind. But then he’s more like a normal quarterback in more even situations, and makes more mistakes when his team is ahead.But the “comeback” award doesn’t care how a quarterback plays when he’s ahead, and this season Romo has played great when trailing. He has taken the kinds of risks I like to see (high touchdown rates and high interception rates when trailing), and those have translated into wins. His average passes go more than 10 yards downfield when Dallas is trailing by a large amount, and he has added roughly 3 percent to his team’s chances of winning every drive — good for third-best in the league. (I’ve posted a plot of air yards vs. win percentage added on Twitter). Moreover, when you factor in DeMarco Murray’s WPA troubles because of fumbles, almost all of the Cowboys’ success on offense has come from Romo.Oh, and he came back to play in the fourth quarter with a broken back.So Romo wins my Comeback Player of the Mid-Year Award, and hopefully he can come back from his back troubles to sling it up some more. (In which case, could he win the actual comeback trophy as well? Can you come back in the same year that you go out?)And one more thingWith the awards handed out, let’s part ways with the win curves for some other quarterbacks as well. Again, I’d consider Manning the high baseline — Andrew Luck’s curve looks slightly better than Manning’s, though it’s over a much shorter career. I’ll leave you with the results and you can find your own narratives.Reminder: If you tweet questions to me @skepticalsports, there is a non-zero chance that I’ll answer them here.Charts by Reuben Fischer-Baum. read more