How to launch your search for ancestors

first_imgJOIN a local genealogy society or historical society. CHART everything you find. A timeline can prove or disprove information you’ve found. Source: www.awesomegenealogy.com/awetips.shtml160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsLOOK FOR a family Bible that records births, deaths and marriages. CHECK OUT local cemeteries for names on tombstones. LOOK FOR Census records online and in libraries and family history centers. CHECK FOR data at a local historical society. GO TO the courthouse and search for deeds, wills, court records and other data. You’re ready to start researching your ancestors, but don’t know where to start. Here are some tips from seasoned researchers: ASK living relatives where and when they were born, their occupations and marriage dates. Then ask for the same information about deceased parents and grandparents, including where they’re buried. SEND FOR copies of birth and death certificates for your relatives; these will show names of their parents and other information. CHECK newspaper archives for birth and death announcements. last_img read more

Schools lag in physical activity

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 210 days, according to the report. Also in compliance were San Gabriel Unified, South Whittier Elementary, Temple City Unified and Whittier City Elementary school districts. Pasadena Unified School District failed to meet the time requirements. Ironically, L.A. Unified was among the first to ban soda and junk food on its campuses to curb childhood obesity. But administrators say they’ve had to sacrifice physical education while beefing up efforts to improve academic achievement. “When teachers are looking at the pressures of the day and everything on their plates to teach, I don’t think they consciously leave physical education out. It just sometimes gets pushed off the plate,” said Ronni Ephraim, LAUSD’s chief instructional officer for elementary programs. The district has launched a training program to help elementary school teachers incorporate physical education into a school day already crowded with required academic subjects, she said. LOS ANGELES – Despite its campaign against childhood obesity, the Los Angeles Unified School District failed to provide its elementary students with the minimum amount of physical education mandated by the state, a study released today says. The report, “Dropping the Ball,” found that 51 percent of 73 California school districts with elementary students failed to provide youngsters with 200 minutes of physical education every 10 days – or an average of 20 minutes a day. “Our priorities are tragically skewed,” said Harold Goldstein, executive director of the California Center for Public Health Advocacy, which examined data provided by the state Department of Education. “We’re in the midst of a severe and growing childhood obesity epidemic, and yet most of our children are missing out on even the most basic school physical-activity opportunities.” The two East San Gabriel Valley districts studied, Garvey and El Monte City school districts, fulfilled the required 200 minutes of P.E. every For example, a teacher could have students go out for a run and then calculate their heart rate as part of a science lesson. Elementary school teachers are required to devote 2 hours a day to language-arts instruction and an hour to math, in addition to science, social studies, health education and other subjects, Ephraim said. And more than half of the district’s elementary school students are English-language learners who require additional instruction. “To close the achievement gap,” Ephraim said, “we have to give kids more time.” The additional teacher training will help, but it might take the district a couple years to come fully into compliance, she said. Because the state Department of Education has been monitoring compliance for only two years, it is concentrating its efforts on bringing districts into compliance rather than issuing penalties, said Rosie Thomas, compliance oversight manager for the department. The problem is compounded by the fact that few elementary teachers have adequate training to teach physical education. Even so, schools need to make it more of a priority, Goldstein said. “Physical education is the ugly stepchild in California public schools,” he said. “There are children who need additional assistance – in learning language, for example – but that doesn’t mean the time should be taken away from physical education. … If physical education became a higher priority, students in LAUSD would do better academically. It’s not either-or. It’s both.” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has proposed spending $85 million to improve physical education in kindergarten through eighth grade, but the state Legislature wants to allocate that money as block grants schools could use as they please, Goldstein said. “The governor has thrown a touchdown pass,” he said, “and the Legislature is about to drop the ball.” [email protected] (818) 713-3663160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more